Scholarship profile: Lars Noah

Published: November 13th, 2000

Category: News

Professor Lars Noah recently surpassed the 1,000 page mark in published law review articles (more than two dozen pieces in the last seven years). In the last 12 months, his work has appeared in Georgetown Law Journal, William & Mary Law Review, Hastings Law Journal, Tulane Law Review, Emory Law Journal, Duke Environmental Law & Policy Forum, Environmental Law Reporter and Health Law News. Professor Noah’s scholarship reflects a wide range of interests, focusing at times on administrative law, products liability, law & medicine, and FDA regulatory matters. His articles also touch on widely disparate subjects such as Constitutional Law, antitrust, criminal procedure, evidence, international trade, intellectual property, land use planning, federal courts, civil procedure, Environmental Law, and professional ethics. “When I undertake a new writing project, it’s at least in part an excuse to learn something new,” Noah says. “I don’t start with a gimmick or a partisan axe to grind.” Professor Noah’s work has been cited by state and federal courts and in more than 200 scholarly articles. Because of his published articles, he has testified before (and served as a consultant to members of) Congress and federal agencies; spoken to academics, lawyers and judges throughout the country, including recent conferences or colloquia at Stanford, Harvard, Texas, Georgetown, Hastings, Kansas and Arizona State. He has addressed conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine; and been quoted by a number of national media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, New York Times, National Law Journal, Business Week, Newsweek, USA Today and National Public Radio.Noah has taught a broad range of subjects (Torts, Administrative Law, Products Liability, Conflict of Laws, Civil Procedure, Food & Drug Law, and now Medical Technology), twice been recognized as “Teacher of the Year” at UF, and served as a visiting law professor at the University of Texas, University of California (Hastings), and Washington & Lee University. He earned his B.A. and J.D., both magna cum laude, from Harvard University, where he received the Sears Prize, for the highest first year grades in law school, and served as an editor of Harvard Law Review.

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