Faculty scholarships and activities

Published: November 22nd, 2010

Category: News Briefs

Alyson Flournoy
Professor of Law; Director, Environmental & Land Use Law Program
“How much will BP oil spill change offshore drilling in Gulf?” (Nov. 13, 2010, Orlando Sentinel)

In this article, which explores what the future of oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico might hold regarding prevention and safety, Flournoy commented on federal regulation and reform to help prevent future spills.

From the article:
Alyson Flournoy, a University of Florida law professor and principal contributor to a BP disaster report by the Center for Progressive Reform think tank, said federal regulators must be given far greater authority and additional resources to drive reform.

“Within the U.S. legal system, industry has had incentives for safety, but obviously they haven’t been enough,” she said.

Paul R. Gugliuzza
Visiting Legal Skills Professor
Gugliuzza presented his paper, “The New Federal Circuit Mandamus,” at the Florida Legal Scholarship Forum on Saturday, Nov. 13. The conference was hosted by Stetson University Law School.

Lyrissa Lidsky
Stephen C. O’Connell Chair, Professor of Law
“Request for documents in church case denied” (Nov. 10, 2010, Ocala Star-Banner)

A former church teacher at Open Door Community Church has been charged with 19 counts of sexual abuse against minors. The prosecutor in the case suspected the church leaders were warning its members about the possible financial consequences for the church’s future in a case like this, and tried to subpoena all written correspondence regarding the case. The defense argued such a request was a violation of free speech.

From the article:
“The balancing tends to come down in favor of law enforcement in the interest of prosecuting crimes,” said UF law professor Lyrissa C. Lidsky, who teaches First Amendment law. “That [accusation of child molestation] is such a serious crime and of such great public interest, I don’t think there’s much weight to any First Amendment case.”

Diane Mazur
Professor of Law
“The Other ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’” (Nov. 10, 2010, The Weekly Standard)

This article discusses the issue of the lack of ROTC on college campuses from the point of view that some campuses have banned the organization. Mazur’s opinion that there is no ban is referenced in the story.

Kenneth Nunn
Professor of Law
“Back off barbershop raids” (Nov. 13, 2010, Orlando Sentinel)

In the Orlando area, several barbershops have been raided with relatively little criminal activity uncovered; the most common arrest being for “barbering without a license.” Some feel that the police are being overzealous in their recent tactics; which have been reported to be unnecessarily aggressive and unfair. The police department denies being overly aggressive, but admits that some aspects of the raids could have been done better.

From the article:
Kenneth B. Nunn, a professor at the University of Florida Levin College of Law, calls the sweeps a case of “over-policing.” An expert in criminal law and race relations, Mr. Nunn called the deputies’ “response to allegations of barbering without a license … unnecessarily intrusive and overbroad.”

Michael Seigel
Professor of Law
“Request for documents in church case denied” (Nov. 10, 2010, Ocala Star-Banner)

A former church teacher at Open Door Community Church has been charged with 19 counts of sexual abuse against minors. The prosecutor in the case suspected the church leaders were warning its members about the possible financial consequences for the church’s future in a case like this, and tried to subpoena all written correspondence regarding the case. The defense argued such a request was a violation of free speech.

From the article:
“I suppose at some point you could argue the state is acting to harass a religious organization merely to harass it, or prevent it from congregating. Presumably that could rise to a level of denial of a constitutional right,” said University of Florida law professor Michael L. Seigel, who teaches evidence and criminal law.

“But, frankly,” he added, “that would have to be an extreme situation. You would have to induce some significant proof to carry the day that the government’s activity has amounted to such a burden.”

Jeanne T. Tate
Adjunct Professor of Law
“Jeanne T. Tate: Consider Adoption” (Nov. 17, 2010, The Gainesville Sun)

Tate recently wrote an editorial promoting awareness and encouragement of adoption for the more than 123,000 kids in foster care in need of loving, forever homes.

From the article:
From my vantage point as a Florida-licensed adoption attorney for more than 28 years, what we need is continued momentum that elevates our collective consciousness toward adoption and in the direction of what I affectionately refer to as a “forever family.” Without this heightened awareness, too many of our precious kids currently mired in foster care will see their adoption hopes and dreams vanquished, as they simply “age out” of the foster care system upon reaching their 18th birthday.

Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local Government Law
Wolf presented the Boehl Distinguished Lecture in Land Use Policy, Phi Beta Kappa Lecture, at the The University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law Thursday, Nov. 11. His lecture was entitled “Private Property and Public Protection: The Brandeisian Alternative.”