First Day Assignments

NOTE: Not all entries are listed alphabetically by instructor. Please scroll through the entire list.


Professor: Angelo
Course Spring 2014 Enivironmental Law
Law 6471 Section 03F5
Course Materials: The required text for this course is: Farber, Freeman and Carlson, Cases and Materials on Environmental Law (West, eighth edition 2010) ISBN 13 978-0-314-90883-4


Assignments: The first day reading assignment is Pages 1-16 and 22-23

Syllabus: Is on TWEN page.


Professor: Aronson/Cohn
Course Spring 2014 Business Transactions and Document Drafting
Law 6930 Section 6917
Course Materials:
Assignments: Welcome to the spring 2014 Business Transactions and Document Drafting course. This is the 8th year that this course has been offered at the Law School, and your faculty – which devoted considerable time during the “off-season” rethinking, reworking, updating and refreshing the course and associated materials – is very excited about your engagement and participation in this “real world”, skills-based and practical learning opportunity. As you know, our first class will be held on Wednesday, January 8th (in Room 355D). We urge you to log-on to the course’s TWEN site, and navigate and review its features, folders and robust contents – including, in particular, the complete Course Syllabus (with Ground Rules and Administrative Matters) and Course Schedule & Reading Assignments outline – prior to January 8th.

Our first class will be largely foundational in nature, outlining the framework and progression of the course and introducing each of you to the key “building block” constructs and considerations in approaching, practicing and executing the skills associated with proficient and confident document drafting. The class – which will be led by Professor Aronson (the course’s adjunct faculty coordinator and organizer, and one of the four experienced, senior business/corporate law practitioners who will teach this course during the term) – is expected to cover the following topics:

* Course Overview and Complete Syllabus, Schedule & Reading Assignments Outline (Handout); Ground Rules & Administrative Matters; Respect and Professionalism; Class Preparation, Participation and Exercises; “Scoring”, Feedback and Grades; Course TWEN Site and Data Base Resources; Adjunct Faculty, Office/Office Hours and Appointments

*Introduction: Business/Transactional Lawyer's Approach, Mindset, Skills-Base and Tool Kit (Business Lawyer’s Role as Strategist, Translator, Drafter, Advocate, Negotiator, Risk/Compliance Advisor and Trusted Counselor)

*Fundamentals of Proficient Contract Drafting and Effective Transaction Negotiation; Client-Centered Approach – Assessing, Creating and Adding Value Early, Often and Throughout

*Building Blocks and Critical Provisions of Contracts and Business Documents

*Negotiating Contracts and Transactions – The Art & Craft of Negotiation through Drafting, Leveraging Information and Utilizing Qualifications, Limitations and Exceptions

*Primer on (and the Importance of) Term Sheets & Letters of Intent

*A Model for Developing and Improving Contract Drafting Skills

*Introduction to and Context for First Homework (H/W) Assignment

Prior to our first class, all students are expected to have read the following materials (or to have "skimmed" certain contracts/documents as noted below and accessible via the Documents & Forms Supplement link on the Course TWEN site):

Charles M. Fox Text – Table of Contents; Chapters 1 and 2
Course Materials Book (Forepart) – Table of Contents;
Course Syllabus, Ground Rules & Administrative Matters, Course
Overview & Schedule (Pages i-ix)
Course Materials Book – Read and Consider Carefully Pages 1 -
15 (Part I), 19 - 46, 615 - 617, 618 - 624
Documents & Forms Supplement (link on Course TWEN site) –
Selected Consumer Contracts folder (Skim all seven
contracts)
Additional Course Materials (link on Course TWEN site) – Read
(posted articles) Wordsmithing – Why contract language
shouldn’t be an afterthought
(K. Adams); and What They
Don’t Teach Law Students: Lawyering
(D. Segal)

Regarding your “Skim” review of illustrative and form contracts, please “don’t freak out” as you move through these – you are not expected to understand or appreciate (at least, not entirely or for now) these documents at this time; instead, you should get acquainted and become generally familiar with the overall structure, terms/provisions and “flow” of these agreements, their component parts and how they “work” and are put together.

Finally (and importantly), there will be a mandatory (one hour) Online Webinar on Thursday, January 9th, starting at 6:00 pm. Please put this on your calendar, and make sure you’re logged in and ready for the Webinar by no later than 6:00 pm. [We suggest that you log on at least 10 minutes early in the event you have to download any tools for the Webinar to run on your computer operating system.] During the webinar, a representative of The Practical Law Company (PLC) will review the PLC database and platform, in a session entitled Practical Law Basics for Corporate Lawyers (log-in and access details will be provided separately).

On behalf of the course faculty, I look forward to seeing you in class, and beginning this exciting and impactful learning adventure together, on January 8th.

Daniel H. Aronson
Adjunct Professor | University of Florida Levin College of Law
Partner | Berger Singerman LLP


Professor: Burke
Course Spring 2014 Corporate Taxation
Law 6610 Section 5708
Course Materials: The casebook (required) for this course is Schwartz & Lathrope, Fundamentals of Corporate Taxation (8th ed. 2012). You should also have a current copy of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations (complete or selected versions).

Recommended reading: Burke, Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Stockholders (7th ed. 2014).

Assignments: The reading assignment for the first week of class is Schwartz & Lathrope, pp. 1-34.

Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Corp_Tax_Syllabus_Burke_2014.pdf






Professor: Calfee
Course Spring 2014 Income Taxation of Estates & Trusts
Law 6621 Section 12D4
Course Materials: Federal Income Taxation of Estates, Trusts & Beneficiaries, Cases and Materials Spring 2014

Federal Internal Revenue Code Section & Regulations covering Sub Chapter J including related income tax provisions.

Suggested Reference Material (but not mandatory): Federal Income Taxation of Estates, Trusts & Beneficiaries, 3rd Edition, Ferguson, Freeland & Ascher, Aspen Law & Business. (If you are going to work in this area this treatise should be part of your permanent library.)

Assignments: Monday, January 6, 2014
Problem #1 – Read Code, Regulations & Statutes listed under “Assignment.” Provide answers to problems.

Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Income_Tax_Syllabus_Friel.pdf


Professor: Collier
Course Spring 2014 American Legal Thought
Law 6930 Section 7829
Course Materials: The book for this course is Charles W. Collier, Basic Themes in Law and Jurisprudence. There is only one edition of this book, but there are two different printings with two different covers: a blue cover (published by LexisNexis) and a brown cover (published by Anderson Publishing Co.). Either is fine; the contents are identical.

Assignments: Our first class will be introductory.

If you want to read ahead, you can start with the Preface, General Introduction, Introduction to Part I, and Chapter I. We will read all of that chapter. You can get a good idea of the course by looking through the Table of Contents.


Professor: Collier
Course Spring 2014 Supreme Court Workshop Seminar
Law 6936 Section 8790
Course Materials:
Assignments: Our first class will be introductory.


Professor: Cupples
Course Spring 2014 Legal Drafting
Law 6955 Sections 1673 & 1708
Course Materials: Basic Legal Drafting

Assignments: Monday, January 6, 2014:

Read in textbook, Basic Legal Drafting, pages 1 through 28.


Professor: Dale
Course Spring 2014 Comparative Constitutional History
Law 6930 Section 14G2
Course Materials: Galligan and Versteeg, "Theoretical Perspectives on the Social and Political Foundations of Constitutions," in Social and Political Foundations of Constitutions

Assignments: Read Galligan and Versteeg, "Theoretical Perspectives on the Social and Political Foundations of Constitutions," in Social and Political Foundations of Constitutions, pages 11-64.


Professor: Davis, R
Course Spring 2014 Mediation Clinic
Law 6940 Section 9027
Course Materials: Getting to Yes: Negotiation Agreement Without Giving In by Fisher, Ury, and Patton

Spring 2014 County Mediator Manual, available in the Law School Book Store.

Assignments: Friday January 10 First Day Class Meeting – Room 101 Virgil Hawkins Clinic 8:00 a.m. – noon. You must be present (on time) the first day of class or you will be dropped from the class.

Read: Getting to Yes: Negotiation Agreement Without Giving In by Fisher, Ury, and Patton (entire book); Read Agenda/Syllabus and pp. 1 – 6 (White Pages) in County Mediator’s Manual (Available in Law School Book Store)

Register for class on TWEN and read AGENDA/SYLLABUS posted on TWEN Syllabus page.


Professor: Davis, R
Course Spring 2014 Mediation
Law 6383 Section 1277
Course Materials: Getting to Yes: Negotiation Agreement Without Giving In by Fisher, Ury, and Patton

Mediation Theory and Practice (Second Edition) by Alfini, Press, Sternlight and Stulberg

Assignments: Tuesday January 7 First Day Class Meeting -- Room 284 3 p.m.

Read: Getting to Yes: Negotiation Agreement Without Giving In by Fisher, Ury, and Patton (entire book); Mediation Theory and Practice (Second Edition) by Alfini, Press, Sternlight and Stulberg pp. 31 – 32; 107 – 109(top); Chapter 44 Fl. Statutes

Register for class on TWEN and read Syllabus posted on TWEN Syllabus page.


Professor: Dawson
Course Spring 2014 Estates & Trusts
Law 6430 Section 1261
Course Materials: 1) Casebook: Sterk, Leslie, and Dobris, Estates and Trusts (Foundation; 4th Ed., 2011)

2) Statutory materials: Florida Statutes (FS) The web site for the Florida Statutes is: http://www.flsenate.gov/Statutes/index.cfm?Mode=View%20Statutes&Submenu=1&Tab=statutes

The conduct rules for Florida lawyers (Florida Rules) are at: http://www.floridabar.org/divexe/rrtfb.nsf/WContents?OpenView

I will provide you with an electronic file containing the statutes and conduct rules you will need for the course

Assignments: Class

1 - 4

Topic

Introduction; The Role of the Lawyer; Probate and Non-probate Transfers
Pages

1 - 64
566 - 570
984 -1002

Problems and Statutes

Problems: p. 27 – 28; 33 - 34
FS 222.13; 655.78 -
.825; 689.15; 732.802;
736.1104. Florida Rules
4-1.1; 4-1.6; 4-1.7; 4-1.9;
4-1.10; 4-1.16




Professor: Dawson
Course Spring 2014 Sales
Law 6010 Section 12CH
Course Materials: Books:

Keating, Sales: A Systems Approach (Aspen 5th ed. 2011)

Mann, Warren & Westbrook, (eds.), Comprehensive Commercial Law (Wolters Kluwer (2013) (Note: This is a statutory supplement. If you have a different supplement that includes the following materials, you need not purchase this one.)

Statutory Materials:

The following statutory materials are required for this course. They are included in Comprehensive Commercial Law (above) and normally are included in other compilations of commercial law statutes.

Uniform Commercial Code Article 2 with Comments

Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act

Uniform Electronic Transactions Act

UNCITRAL Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG)


Assignments: First Week Assignment

Classes 1 & 2

Role of Codes; Scope Issues

Casebook pp. 1-24; 37-44
Problems 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 2.5,


Professor: Dilley
Course Spring 2014 Employee Pensions and Benefits
Law 6541 Section 05HD
Course Materials: Pension and Employee Benefit Law, Langbein, Pratt & Stabile 5th Edition [hereinafter “LPS”]

Current Supplement (will be linked at web site)

Statute: Selected Portions of ERISA and the Code (Any recent version of the Income Tax Code and Regs used in Tax I courses will be fine, or you can find the proper sections on line. I will provide ERISA sections at course web site)
The LEXIS web site for this class will be available for your self-registration beginning January 2nd.



Assignments: First Assignment (for Jan/ 6-9 )

For our first class, read LPS Chapter 1. This reading is largely background, but as you read, think about and be prepared to discuss the following questions:


(1) Do professional athletes really "retire" at age 35? Should they be able to? Should anyone?

(2) When do you expect to be able to retire? When would you ideally like to retire?

(3) Why do you want to retire? Why do you think most people want to retire?

(4) Whose interests are served by the institution of retirement? Is it only retirees who benefit?

(5) Is it possible to “raise the retirement age”?

(6) Do you think Social Security will be paying benefits by the time you retire? Why or why not?

(7) Would private savings accounts be a better way for all Americans to provide for their retirement?

(8) If Social Security is supposed to be some type of “insurance”, what risk is it insuring against?

(9) Is there away for everyone to benefit from investing in the stock market?

This will probably take us most of Monday and then we will move on to LPS Ch. 2 – we will talk about the various types of plans on Wednesday and Thursday. We may also on Thursday begin Chapter 3 – we’ll read pp. 78-83, on the origins of ERISA, but we may not get that far depending on how the discussion goes.




Professor: Dowd
Course Spring 2014 Family Law and Social Policy
Law 6936 Section 12A3
Course Materials:
Assignments: January 6: King and Carbone excerpts (posted on Course Materials)

Shani King, The Family Law Canon in a (Post?) Racial Era, 72 Ohio St. L. J. 575 (2011)(excerpts) (link available on TWEN to full article)
June Carbone, Out of the Channel and Into the Swamp: How Family Law Fails in a New Era of Class Division, 39 Hofstra L. Rev. 859 (2011)(excerpts) (link available on TWEN to full article)


Professor: Dupee
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 1647
Course Materials: Teresa J. Reid Rambo & Leanne J. Pflaum, Legal Writing by Design, 2nd Ed. (2013).

Assignments: Read text Chs. 13 and 21.

The text is Teresa J. Reid Rambo & Leanne J. Pflaum, Legal Writing by Design, 2nd Ed. (2013). This is the same text that was used for Legal Writing.


Professor: Fenster
Course Spring 2014 Payment Systems
Law 6020 Section 6081
Course Materials: Ronald Mann, Payment Systems and Other Financial Transactions

Assignments: The readings for the first three class periods are:

1. pp. 3-11, and be prepared, based on your own web-browsing, to have a reasonably informed discussion about Bitcoin.
2. Assignment 1 (pp. 13-25)
3. Assignment 2 (pp. 26-44)


Professor: Fenster
Course Spring 2014 Administrative Law
Law 6520 Section 0357
Course Materials: Richard Seamon, Administrative Law: A Context and Practice Casebook.

Assignments: The readings for the first three class periods are:

[1] Chapter 1 -- Welcome to Administrative Law.
[2] Chapter 2 -- Administrative-Law Problem Solving; Overview of the Rest of this Book
[3] Chapter 3 -- Statutory Research and Analysis in Administrative Law


Professor: Ferreri
Course Spring 2014 Art Law
Law 6936 Section 089H
Course Materials: Primary textbook

Patty Gerstenblith, Art, Cultural Heritage, and the Law (Third Edition) Carolina Academic Press 2012

Each assignment includes materials in the text. Students must read also the primary materials in the Appendix noted in the assigned chapters.

Other materials will be suggested for enrichment, including but not limited to press clippings and books.

Students are encouraged but not required to watch the following films:
The Monuments Men (2014) starring George Clooney
The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) starring Pierce Brosnan
The Rape of Europa (2007) documentary
The Train (1964) starring Burt Lancaster

Assignments: Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/art_law_2014.pdf




Professor: Flocks
Course Spring 2014 Poverty Law
Law 6812 Section 5667
Course Materials: Flocks, LAW6812, Poverty Law course packet. Available at law school bookstore.
Other assigned articles will be available through the course TWEN site, as indicated.

Please register on TWEN site. First week course materials (under “Course Materials”). Syllabus will be posted there before the start of class.


Assignments: Week 1: Defining Poverty: Characteristics and Perceptions

1/6: Introduction and measuring poverty. “What are Poverty Thresholds and Poverty Guidelines?” (Institute for Research on Poverty) available at Course Materials on TWEN or at http://www.irp.wisc.edu/faqs/faq1.htm “How is Poverty Measured in the United States?” (Institute for Research on Poverty) available at Course Materials on TWEN or at http://www.irp.wisc.edu/faqs/faq2.htm

1/7: Who is poor? Characteristics of poverty. “Who is Poor? Basic Characteristics of the Poor,” “Where are the Poor. Geography of Poverty,” and “Who is Poor? A More Detailed View” (Center for Poverty Research) available at Course Materials on TWEN or at http://poverty.ucdavis.edu/frequently-asked-questions.

1/8: Documentary: “Park Avenue – Money, Power, and the American Dream.”


Professor: Flournoy/Klein
Course Spring 2014 Property
Law 5400 Section 089F
Course Materials: [Dukeminier, Krier, Alexander & Schill’s PROPERTY (7th ed. 2010) published by Aspen Publishers].

Assignments: Assignment for Tuesday Jan. 7

Be sure you have the casebook for the course [Dukeminier, Krier, Alexander & Schill’s PROPERTY (7th ed. 2010) published by Aspen Publishers]. There is a TWEN webpage for this course. Go to http://www.westlaw.com and click on TWEN under “Law School Resources” on the left bottom of the page. Then click on “Add a course” and find this course on the list. The syllabus and an assignment sheet for the first week of the semester are already posted. All students in the course are required to register on the website.

Read pp. 1-17 in the casebook (you can skip the footnotes in the notes). Below are some questions to help guide your reading. You should not focus your reading solely on answering these questions. You should read to understand the material thoroughly. These simply provide you some guidance on what we’re most likely to spend time on in class, so that you can be particularly prepared to discuss them.

1. Be prepared to briefly describe the facts of Johnson v. M’Intosh. What is the plaintiff’s cause of action? On what do plaintiff and defendant base their claims?

2. In the first two paragraphs of the opinion, on page 4 of your book, the Court describes certain facts. Why don’t these resolve the issue in the case? What rights does the Court recognize in the Native Americans? Why? We’ll spend some time discussing the Court’s rationale, the various sources it cites, and why it considers these relevant.

3. What is the right of occupancy? What are native tribes in whom this right is recognized permitted to do? What can European claimants do that Native Americans can’t?

4. What is the sequence of the plaintiff and defendant’s acquisition of an alleged interest in the land? Does whoever’s claim arose first in time dictate the outcome?

5. What is the underlying principle on which US title to land is based? We’ll talk about whether the concepts the Court relies on are a good grounding for property rights.

6. We’ll talk briefly about John Locke’s theory of property. Be prepared to summarize what you understand from the paragraph describing it. Think critically about the Lockean narrative. What values does it advance? What are its limitations?




Professor: Friel
Course Spring 2014 Income Taxation
Law 6600 Section 12AH
Course Materials: Taxation of Individual Income (Burke & Friel, 10th edition).

Assignments: My first day assignment for my section of Income Taxation is to read Chapter 1 of the casebook Taxation of Individual Income (Burke & Friel, 10th edition).

Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Income_Tax_Syllabus_Friel.pdf


Professor: Gianni
Course Spring 2014 International Tax
Law 6936 Section 1E75
Course Materials: Joseph Isenbergh, International Taxation (Concepts & Insights), Foundation Press.

Daniel J. Lathrope, Selected Sections United States International Taxation, Foundation Press.

Students should have access to law journals online. Reading assignments for each class will be posted on the course Web site (TWEN) at least one week in advance of the scheduled class meeting.

Assignments: Syllabus and Assignments on TWEN.


Professor: Grater
Course Spring 2014 Interviewing, Counseling and Negotiation
Law 6930 Sections 044G, 044H, 0443, 1C94 & 6182
Course Materials: Course Materials:

1. Our textbook is Legal Counseling, Negotiating, and Mediating: A Practical Approach, Second Edition, by Herman and Cary. Readings will be supplemented by postings on canvas, our new open-source learning management system. Please

ICN is divided into two major parts: The first weekly class is held with all students together, and will be taught primarily through lecture and discussion.

The second weekly class is a workshop with 12 students each. These workshops will involve many role play exercises. To give you the best feedback possible on your performances, you will video record many of them on your laptop (see below).

2. Each student is *required* to bring to every workshop class:

* a laptop computer
* a web camera (either built into the laptop, or stand-alone)
* software that allows you to record video to your laptop using the web cam

Before classes start, please make sure your equipment works. We will give you instruction on how videos will be uploaded to our server.

Assignments: Monday 6 January: Introduction to the course, expectations, the role of deliberate practice, and different models of interviewing and counseling. Assignment: Please read chapters One and Two in the text and the following articles: 10,000 Hours of Practice
(http://www.wisdomgroup.com/blog/10000-hours-of-practice/) and Kaufman, J., It Takes 20 Hours Not 10,000 Hours To Learn A Skill (http://sdrv.ms/15NvA3I).

Wednesday 8 January: We will meet in room 345 to work with tech support on setting up your laptop to record role plays and upload them to the law school's server. You will also breakout into your workshop groups to test your laptops and baseline interviewing skills with an easy "no preparation" interview. Assignment: Bring your laptop and your full attention.

Note: The full syllabus will be posted on canvas soon. Pay attention to your email for updates.


Professor: Grater
Course Spring 2014 Civil Clinic
Law 6940 Sections 2739 & 4269
Course Materials: Civil Clinic - Family Advocacy
Law 6940, Sections 2739 and 4269 (Note that the Lab is just part of the full rep clinic, and meets in the same room).

Course Materials:

The syllabus and all course materials will be on canvas, our open-source learning management system (somewhat similar to TWEN). If you have not yet received an invitation to canvas, please email Prof. Grater at grater@law.ufl.edu.

Assignments: Please see canvas for what you need to do to prepare for the first class. Please get started early, as substantial reading and written work is due for the first class on Monday, 6 January at 9:00 in room 109, BGH. Expect to have a two hour class each weekday for the first week, and probably part of the second, to prepare you to represent clients. We will work around your schedules.


Professor: Hamann
Course Spring 2014 Wetlands & Watersheds
Law 6930 Section 7193
Course Materials:
Assignments: Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Hamann_2014_syllabus_14_Wetlands.pdf






Professor: Harmon
Course Spring 2014 Mergers and Acquisitions
Law 6930 Section 13AA
Course Materials: Mergers and Acquisitions: Cases, Materials, and Problems, Therese H. Maynard (Aspen Publishers 2013) (3rd Edition).

Assignments: The first day class assignment may be found on TWEN in the syllabus available (December 15, 2013) prior to classes.


Professor: Harris
Course Spring 2014 Family Law
Law 6710 Section 05FF
Course Materials: FAMILY LAW, Harris, Carbone, and Teitelbaum (Aspen, 4th ed. 2010)

Assignments: For the first day of class, please read and be prepared to discuss pp. 1-32 in the text.

For the second day, please read and be prepared to discuss pp. 33-49 and Fla Stat 708.05, 708.08, 708.09 and 708.10. You can access the Florida statutes from the class TWEN page.


Professor: Harrison
Course Spring 2014 Law and Economics
Law 6555 Section 129F
Course Materials: Thomas Cotter and Jeffrey L. Harrison, Law and Economics 3d ed. (2013).

Assignments: Week 1, Jan. 6

Chapter 1 Introduction

Demand and supply, 6-25


Professor: Hudson
Course Spring 2014 Immigration Law
Law 6264 Section 09AB
Course Materials: Legomsky, Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy (5th Ed. 2009)

Aleinikoff, Martin Motomura and Fullerton, Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States [selected statutes, regulations and forms].

Assignments: First Class, Monday, January 6: Read the "Preface" (pp. v - viii), "Technical Conventions and Abbreviations" (pp. xv - xviii), and page 1 - 11 and 24 [Sec. B] - 37 in the Legomsky casebook. Think about and be prepared to discuss the questions raised by the author.


Syllabus- http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/immigration_and_nationality_law_2014spring.pdf


Professor: Hutchinson
Course Spring 2014 Constitutional Law
Law 5501 Section 1349
Course Materials: I have attached your first-week assignment. PLEASE NOTE: The attached documents contains SEVERAL LINKS to readings. Please click those links. If you have difficulty with the links, please contact me BEFORE MONDAY. Also, you can simply Google the title of the documents, if you encounter difficulty reaching them from the document. These are not optional readings.

Darren Lenard Hutchinson
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair & Professor of Law
University of Florida Levin College of Law
Hutchinson@law.ufl.edu
Dissenting_justice@live.com
352-273-0918 (office)
202-276-0146 (cellular)

Assignments: Summary
The first set of readings compares the Articles of Confederation with the Constitution. The second set of readings addresses the concept of judicial review and includes the famous case, Marbury v. Madison. We should reach Marbury on Wednesday and discuss pp. 16-34 on Friday.

Study Guide
For the first day, prepare to discuss the similarities and differences between the Constitution and the Articles of Confederation and the problems that led the nation to discard the Articles. Do one very specific thing: Closely compare the language in Article II of the Articles of Confederation with Amendment X of the Constitution.

Also, for Monday, please consider whether you believe the Constitution allows Erick Munoz (discussed in the CNN article) to refuse life support for his pregnant wife or whether Texas can force her to remain on life support. Does the Constitution address any of these issues explicitly? Where?

For Wednesday and Friday, outline and prepare to discuss Marbury and the readings regarding judicial review. You should come to class able to understand the facts of the case, the historical and precedential significance of the case, and the argument that Marshall makes to justify judicial review. Also, pay attention to the notes. We will discuss their content.

Readings

I. Monday

(A) The Articles of Confederation -- at this link: ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION

(B) The Constitution of the United States of America, in Sullivan textbook, at pp. lxv-lxxix. Pay careful attention to: Articles I, II, and III and Amendments I-X, XI-XVI, XIX, and XXVI.

(C) John A. Altman, The Articles and the Constitution: Similar in Nature, Different in Design, 3 PENNSYLVANIA LEGACIES 20-21 (May 2003) (see attachment)

(D) Founders on the Defects of the Articles of Confederation (Excerpts from Various Letters, 1780-1787; Source: National Humanities Center) -- at this link: FOUNDERS ON THE DEFECTS OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION.

(E) James Madison, Vices of the Political System of the United States (April 1787; Source: National Humanities Center)

(F) Husband of pregnant woman wants her off life support, CNN, Dec. 24, 2013, at http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/23/health/pregnant-life-support-texas/


II. Wednesday

Textbook, pp. 1-16

III. Friday

Textbook, pp. 16-34


The Articles and the Constitution: Similar in Nature, Different in Design
Author(s): John A. Altman
Reviewed work(s):
Source: Pennsylvania Legacies, Vol. 3, No. 1 (May 2003), pp. 20-21
Published by: The Historical Society of Pennsylvania
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27764871
Accessed: 03/01/2013 14:08

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Professor: Jackson
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 5879
Course Materials: Syllabus: On SAKAI.

Assignments: Although class normally meets on Mondays and Thursdays, our first class has been rescheduled for Wed. Jan. 8 at 12:00 in Room 180.

For our first class, read the statutory provisions of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 (RFRA) found at 42 U.S.C. §§ 2000bb, 2000bb-1; and read Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. v. Sebelius, 724 F.3d 377 (3d Cir. 2013)[majority opinion]. All of these readings can be found under the Resources tab on the Sakai course webpage, or on-line via Lexis, Westlaw, or Bloomberg Law.

NOTE: You are PROHIBITED from reviewing any briefs filed in the Conestoga Wood case or in any other case challenging the contraceptive coverage mandate of the Affordable Care Act. If you have any doubts about the scope of this restriction, or questions as to whether a source you wish to consult is permitted, CONTACT ME first, before you consult the source.

See you Jan. 8! Joe Jackson




Professor: Jacobs
Course Spring 2014 Criminal Procedure: Police and Police Practice
Law 6111 Section 8851
Course Materials:
Assignments: All students should read the following two news items prior to coming to class on Tuesday:

The Demise and Afterlife of the "Detroit Sleeper Cell" Case and Forensic Tools: What's Reliable and What's Not So Scientific

How are technological advances impacting the identification of suspects and why should we be concerned about technological developments in Criminal Procedure?


Professor: Jacobs
Course Spring 2014 International Criminal Law
Law 6930 Section 084E
Course Materials:
Assignments: All students should read the UN Report on Chemical Weapons in Syria before coming to class. Do not wait until 30 minutes before class to read. Be prepared to answer the following questions:

1. Why is the UN concerned with the use of chemical weapons?
2. Would the use of chemical weapons violate international legal obligations?
3. If so, what legal obligations would be violated
4. Even if you conclude that no international legal obligations would be violated, why should the world community be concerned about the use of chemical weapons in an armed conflict?


Professor: Johnson
Course Spring 2014 Regulating Financial Institutions
Law 6936 Section 12A9
Course Materials: Anthony Saunders, Marcia Cornett, FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS, 5th Ed.

David Stowell, INVESTMENT BANKS, HEDGE FUNDS, AND PRIVATE EQUITY, 2d Ed.

Please copy the following email address on any correspondence directed to Professor Johnson: kristin.johnson@shu.edu

Assignments: The readings for this course are posted on TWEN.

Introduction to Financial Institutions:
Investment Banks, Underwriting, Public Offerings


Professor: Johnson
Course Spring 2014 Corporations
Law 6063 Section 1E62
Course Materials: William A. Klein, J. Mark Ramseyer, and Stephen M. Bainbridge, Business Associations: Cases and Materials on Agency, Partnerships, and Corporations (Foundation Press 8th Edition 2012) (“KRB”).

Klein, Ramseyer, and Bainbridge’s Business Associations-Agency, Partnerships, LLCs and Corporations, Statutes and Rules, 2013 (“Statutory Supplement”)

You should bring these required texts with you to class.

Assignments: 1. Read: KBR - Gorton v. Doty; A. Gay Jenson Farms Co. v. Cargill, Inc.;
Reading v. Regem (KRB pages 1-13) (KRB 69-71)

2. Review: Statutory Supplement – Restatement (Third) on Agency: § 1.01-1.03; 8.01, 8.02, 8.04-8.06. 8.08-8.10


Professor: Johnston
Course Spring 2014 Criminal Procedure-Adversary Systems
Law 6112 Section 065A
Course Materials: The textbook for this class will be Advanced Criminal Procedure, by Kamisar, LaFave, Israel, King, Kerr, and Primus (13th ed. 2012). You may also use Modern Criminal Procedure (13th ed. 2012), by the same authors. The page numbers are identical in both books. We will also use the 2013 supplement to this case book, which includes recent cases, selected statutes, and rules from the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure (FRCP).

Assignments: For the first day of class, please read case book pages 1-6(top), 10(booking)- 21(end of n.3), and 61-63. Also please read pages 2-3 in the 2013 supplement to the case book.


Professor: Johnston
Course Spring 2014 Law & Psychiatry
Law 6726 Section 05BD
Course Materials: The case book for this course is Law and the Mental Health System: Civil and Criminal Aspects, by Christopher Slobogin, Arti Rai, and Ralph Reisner (5th ed. 2009).

Assignments: For Monday, January 6, please read pages 1-8; skim pages 8 (bottom) – 12 (end of n.2); and read pages 12 (n.3) – 22. In addition, please read the New Yorker article posted on TWEN: “God Knows Where I Am.”


Professor: Klein
Course Spring 2014 Environmental Capstone Colloquium
Law 6930 Section 4094
Course Materials: Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma.

Assignments: The introductory class on January 9 is mandatory. In preparation for that class, please read chapters 1-4 of the class text: Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma. In addition, please sign upon on the class TWEN site, which will be available about a week before class begins.


Professor: Klein
Course Spring 2014 Water Law
Law 6930 Section 129A
Course Materials: Adler et al., Modern Water Law, Foundation Press (2013).

Assignments: For the first week of class, please read lightly pp. 1-21 in the casebook: Adler et al., Modern Water Law, Foundation Press (2013). In addition, please sign up on the class TWEN site, which will be available about a week before class begins.


Professor: Knight
Course Spring 2014 Legal Drafting
Law 6955 Sections 1674 & 1844
Course Materials: Basic Legal Drafting

Assignments: Monday, January 6, 2014

Read in textbook, Basic Legal Drafting, pages 1 through 28.


Professor: Lidsky
Course Spring 2014 Cyberlaw
Law 6936 Section 12A4
Course Materials: I will provide the course materials by emailing them to you, emailing the link to the materials to you, and/or posting them on the TWEN page for this course. I apologize if you find this method inconvenient, but I am editing the materials myself to save you the almost $200 a casebook would cost you. I hope you will find the savings worth the hopefully minor inconvenience.


Assignments: Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/syllabus_cyberlaw_Lidsky_14.pdf





Professor: Luke
Course Spring 2014 Partnership Taxation
Law 6616 Section 4789
Course Materials: See Syllabus

Assignments: 1st day assignment: Read pages 1-40 of the textbook and complete the section 2.A problems on pages 1-2 of the problem book.

Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Partnership_Tax_Syllabus_Luke.pdf





Professor: Luke
Course Spring 2014 Income Taxation
Law 6600 Section 3385
Course Materials: See Syllabus

Assignments: 1st day assignment: Casebook 1-20 (note: chapter problem will not be discussed in detail in class); Form 1040 (available at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040.pdf); Form 1040 Schedule A (available at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040sa.pdf).

Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Income_Tax_Syllabus_Luke.pdf






Professor: Malavet
Course Spring 2014 Evidence
Law 6330 Section 1233
Course Materials: • The required class materials are: (1) Christopher B. Mueller and Laird C. Kirkpatrick, EVIDENCE UNDER THE RULES (7th. ed., Aspen Law & Business 2011; ISBN: 978-0-7355-0747-0); (2) Mueller & Kirkpatrick, 2013: Federal Rules of Evidence: With Advisory Committee Notes and Legislative History (Aspen Law & Business 2013; ISBN: 978-14548-2794-8). Please note that the new editions account for new cases in the confrontation area as well as the restyling of the Federal Rules of Evidence. Also, because the examination is “open rules,” you must purchase the designated Federal Rules of Evidence supplement. No other supplement will be allowed in the examination room.

Assignments: My class materials are posted online in my personal website: http://nersp.osg.ufl.edu/~malavet/index.shtml

The materials related to the Evidence course may be found here: http://nersp.osg.ufl.edu/~malavet/evidence/evmain.htm

• The assignments for the class sessions for our first week of the Spring 2014 are posted below
• Future assignments will be posted in the Assignments and Notes Page (http://nersp.osg.ufl.edu/~malavet/evidence/notes/evnotes.htm).
The required class materials are: (1) Christopher B. Mueller and Laird C. Kirkpatrick, EVIDENCE UNDER THE RULES (7th. ed., Aspen Law & Business 2011; ISBN: 978-0-7355-0747-0); (2) Mueller & Kirkpatrick, 2013: Federal Rules of Evidence: With Advisory Committee Notes and Legislative History (Aspen Law & Business 2013; ISBN: 978-14548-2794-8). Please note that the new editions account for new cases in the confrontation area as well as the restyling of the Federal Rules of Evidence. Also, because the examination is “open rules,” you must purchase the designated Federal Rules of Evidence supplement. No other supplement will be allowed in the examination room.

Week One: January 7-9, 2014

Chapter: 1.0 Evidence Law and the System
• Tuesday, January 7, 2014
• Session 1-A

o Class rules, testing, grading and administrative matters.
o Review the Syllabus (http://nersp.osg.ufl.edu/~malavet/evidence/evsyll.htm).

Session 1-B
o Introduction: Why Evidence & The Trial, 1-18
o Pay special attention to What is the Record?, 12-18

Thursday, January 9, 2014
• Session 2-A

o Making the Record & Admitting Evidence, 19-29
o Problem 1-A: How did it happen? (p. 25)

Session 2-B
o How Evidence is Excluded, 19-48
o Consequences of Evidential Error, 41-47
o Obtaining Review of Evidence Points, 47-48
o Problem 1-B: He didn't object! (p. 46)



Professor: Mashburn
Course Spring 2014 Florida Legal Ethics
Law 6936 Section 1G82
Course Materials:
Assignments: See TWEN Page


Professor: Mashburn
Course Spring 2014 Professional Responsibility
Law 6750 Section 03C6
Course Materials:
Assignments: See TWEN page


Professor: McLendon
Course Spring 2014 Legislation Drafting
Law 6936 Section 12A7
Course Materials: See Syllabus on TWEN

Assignments: Week 1 – January 9, 2013

Introduction – Nature & Role of Legislatures.

U.S. CONST. art. I
FLA. CONST. art. III

State ex rel. Cunningham v. Davis, 123 Fla. 41, 166 So. 289, reh’g denied, 122 Fla. 700, 166 So. 574 (1936). Organisation.

McPherson v. Flynn, 397 So. 2d 665 (Fla. 1981). Membership.
Moffit v. Willis, 459 So. 2d 1018 (Fla. 1984). Quorum & Procedure.

League of Women Voters v. Florida House, 2013 WL 6580903 (Fla. Dec. 13, 2013). Legislative Privileges.
Florida House v. Expedia, Inc., 85 So. 3d 517 (Fla. 1st DCA 2012). Legislative Privileges.

Suggested:
Girardeau v. State, 403 So. 2d 513 (Fla. 1st DCA 1981). Legislative Privileges.



Professor: McLendon/Mills
Course Spring 2014 Law & Policy in the Americas
Law 6936 Section 084C
Course Materials: • Course materials will be available for purchase at Book iT, 1250 W University Ave. (13th & University-in the Holiday Inn Building where Enterprise used to be, right next to the Beef O'Bradys), ph.# 352-371-9588.

• Sign up on TWEN for the course website.


Assignments: • Read the following from the course materials:

1. Lars Schoultz, Beneath the United States: A History of U.S. Policy Toward Latin America xi-xvii (1998). (Coursepack)

2. Eduardo Silva, Authoritarianism, Democracy and Development, in Latin America Transformed (Robert N. Gwynne & Cristóbal Kay, eds., 2004). (Coursepack)

3. M.C. Mirow, The Code Napoleon: Buried but Ruling in Latin America, 33 Denv. J. Int’l L. & Pol’y 179 (2005) (TWEN)

4. John Rapley, The New Middle Ages, FOREIGN AFFAIRS, May/June 2006, at 95. (Coursepack)

• SUGGESTED BACKGROUND:

1. LATINOBARÓMETRO REPORT 2013 (2013), online in Spanish only at: http://www.latinobarometro.org/latNewsShow.jsp

2. The Latinobarómetro Poll: A slightly brighter picture for democracy, but not for liberal freedoms, THE ECONOMIST, Nov. 2, 2013, available online at: http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21588886-slightly-brighter-picture-democracy-not-liberal-freedoms-listen-me

3. UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME, CITIZEN SECURITY WITH A HUMAN FACE: EVIDENCE & PROPOSALS FOR LATIN AMERICA (Reg. Hum. Dev. Rep. 2013), available online at: http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/hdr/human-development-report-for-latin-america-2013-2014/

4. Alma Guillermoprieto, Days of the Dead: The new narcocultura, THE NEW YORKER, Nov. 10, 2008, available online at: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/11/10/081110fa_fact_guillermoprieto

Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/2014_Lat-Am_Law_Policy_Syllabus.pdf




Professor: Megerman
Course Spring 2014 Legal Research
Law 5803 Section 05DG
Course Materials:
Assignments: Syllabus will be posted to e-learning site.


Professor: Menendez
Course Spring 2014 Legal Drafting
Law 6955 Sections 3944 & 3952
Course Materials: Basic Legal Drafting

Assignments: Monday, January 6, 2014:


Read in textbook, Basic Legal Drafting, pages 1 through 28.


Professor: Nagan
Course Spring 2014 National Security Law
Law 6930 Section 13BF
Course Materials: The primary instrument of teaching in this course is the casebook, National Security Law, 2d Edition by John Norton Moore and Robert Turner (2005). This book is normally accompanied by a volume of National Security documents. Because of the expense of this additional volume, I have placed a volume on reserve for the class. All the documents in this book are accessible online as well. The casebook is updated and supplemented with readings covering a wide variety of national security issues. These are partly those of the casebook editors and partly my own writings. The supplemental materials are far in excess of what is needed for the course but they are made accessible to you should you wish to broaden your own interest in this field. Selections from these readings will from time to time be added to your basic reading assignments.

Assignments: For the first class I would like you to read pages 3-14 in the casebook and read the following blogs which touch on contemporary national security issues and law at this website: http://readersupportednews.org/component/comprofiler/userprofile/Nagan

1. Foreign Policy: Clarification of US Interests in Syria Intervention
2. Open Letter to Senator McCain
3. Chicken Hawks, Neo-cons
4. The Syrian Veto in the Security Council
5. Edward Snowden: Courageous Whistleblower

Read these five blogs and consider the role of a lawyer in the context of an operational current crisis.



Professor: Nagan
Course Spring 2014 Selected Issues in Human Rights Law & Practice
Law 6936 Section 12A5
Course Materials:
Assignments: For the first class please read the document on TWEN: Individuality, Humanism & Human Rights (on course page). The syllabus is also on TWEN.


Professor: Nance
Course Spring 2014 Education Law
Law 6930 Section 129E
Course Materials: DEREK W. BLACK, EDUCATION LAW: EQUALITY, FAIRNESS, AND REFORM (2013)

Assignments: For the first day of class, please be prepared to discuss pp. 1-16 in the casebook. In addition, please register on the class TWEN site, where you will find the syllabus posted.


Professor: Nance
Course Spring 2014 Remedies
Law 6320 Section 045A
Course Materials: DOUGLAS LAYCOCK, MODERN AMERICAN REMEDIES: CASES AND MATERIALS (CONCISE 4TH EDITION).

Assignments: For the first day of class, please be prepared to discuss pp. 1-15 in the casebook. In addition, please register on the class TWEN site, where you will find the syllabus posted.


Professor: Noah
Course Spring 2014 Torts
Law 5700 Section 0124
Course Materials: Franklin et al., Tort Law and Alternatives (Foundation Press 9th ed. 2011) [if you are contemplating purchase of the e-book, first check the exam restrictions appearing on the last page of the syllabus]

[Note revised time -- class will meet 9:40-10:50.]

Assignments: Assignments [the syllabus for this course will be posted on our TWEN site by Dec. 31]:

• Jan. 7 (Tue.): pp.1-29 (you can just skim pp.9-18) • Jan. 8 (Wed.): pp.30-49, Supp. p.1 [posted w/ syllabus] • Jan. 9 (Thu.): pp.49-68



Professor: Outler
Course Spring 2014 Legal Research
Law 5803 Section 05C3
Course Materials: Required text: Mark K. Osbeck, Impeccable Research: A Concise Guide to Mastering Legal Research Skills (West 2010)

Assignments: 1. Re-read Osbeck Chapter 1

2. Retrieve and read the document “In Class Hypo (Flo)” from the Resources link on the e-Learning course website

Syllabus: on e-Learning course website


Professor: Page
Course Spring 2014 Civil Procedure
Law 5301 Section 1294
Course Materials:
Assignments: “For the first day of class, please read pages 1-12 in the Yeazell casebook. Also please read Article III of the U.S. Constitution and 28 U.S.C. §§ 1331 & 1332, all in the 2013 supplement to the Yeazell casebook.”

Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Page_Civil_Procedure_Syl14.pdf







Professor: Pflaum
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 8245
Course Materials: •Text – Legal Writing by Design (2d edition)
by Rambo and Pflaum

The Bluebook (19th Ed.)

Legal Writing and Appellate Advocacy – Pflaum TWEN course (Westlaw)

Assignments: Monday Class 1
1/6 Introduction to Appellate Advocacy

READ: Text - Chapters 13 and 14.

TWEN

Calendar, Syllabus, Course Policies pages 1 - 12.

Record on Appeal – read and decide whether to represent
Defendant or the United States.

List of Authorities - Katz case.


Professor: Powell
Course Spring 2014 Dispute Settlement under International Trade and Investment Agreements
LAw 6930 Section 12A8
Course Materials: David Palmeter & Peter C. Mavroidis, DISPUTE SETTLEMENT IN THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION: PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (2d Ed. Cambridge Univ. Press 2004). Second-hand copies are available online for $5 at, for example, http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=david+palmeter&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Adavid+palmeter.

We will also use the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding and Chapter 11 of the NAFTA. A copy of these treaties as well as cases decided after publication of the Palmeter text will be posted on the course web site.

Assignments: Bring to class a copy of the syllabus, which is available on the student handout table in the Center for Governmental Responsibility (230 Bruton-Geer) or may be printed from the TWEN course web site(password is dispute).

Register as a Course Participant on the course web site and indicate your preferred Discussion Leader class under “Sign-up Sheets.” First come, first served.

January 9 Reading: See Syllabus.



Professor: Rawls
Course Spring 2014 Civil Clinic-Juvenile Law
Law 6940 Section 2706
Course Materials: Florida Rules of Juvenile Procedure, 2013 edition

Assignments: Add the Juvenile Law Clinic-Spring 2014 to your TWEN page. The First Week Assignments are posted on the Juvenile Law Clinic TWEN page. Check your e-mail account for an e-mail from Professor Rawls for the password or email Professor Rawls at rawls@law.ufl.edu.


Professor: Reid
Course Spring 2014 Professional Responsibility
Law 6750 Section 03D1
Course Materials: Please sign up on Prof. Reid’s Evidence TWEN website. The TWEN site contains our Syllabus. Please follow the Syllabus for Monday, Jan. 6 by reading the Course Polices (on our TWEN site); our course book: pages 1-14; Model Rules and comments 7.3, 6.1, 6.2, and 8.4; and the materials posted on our TWEN site under Class 1 Additional Reading.

Assignments: Please sign up on Prof. Reid’s Evidence TWEN website. The TWEN site contains our Syllabus. Please follow the Syllabus for Monday, Jan. 6 by reading the Course Polices (on our TWEN site); our course book: pages 1-14; Model Rules and comments 7.3, 6.1, 6.2, and 8.4; and the materials posted on our TWEN site under Class 1 Additional Reading.


Professor: Reid
Course Spring 2014 Evidence
Law 6330 Section 1230
Course Materials: Please sign up on Prof. Reid’s Evidence TWEN website. The TWEN site contains our Syllabus. Please follow the Syllabus for Monday, Jan. 6 by reading the Course Polices (on our TWEN site), and our course book: pages xxv-xxvii and 1-31. Please also watch the following Frontline special on forensic evidence (will take about 40 minutes):

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/real-csi/


Assignments: Please sign up on Prof. Reid’s Evidence TWEN website. The TWEN site contains our Syllabus. Please follow the Syllabus for Monday, Jan. 6 by reading the Course Polices (on our TWEN site), and our course book: pages xxv-xxvii and 1-31. Please also watch the following Frontline special on forensic evidence (will take about 40 minutes):

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/real-csi/



Professor: Rowe
Course Spring 2013 Trade Secret Law
Law 6930 Section 1298
Course Materials: The required text for this course is Rowe and Sandeen, Cases and Materials on Trade Secret Law.

Assignments: The required text for this course is Rowe and Sandeen, Cases and Materials on Trade Secret Law. All students are required to register on the course TWEN® site. The syllabus is available on TWEN.

Please read pages 1-12 for the first day of class. You should also download and review the course syllabus.



Professor: Ruff
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 8246
Course Materials: See “Course Policies; Syllabus” document posted on Prof. Ruff’s Appellate Advocacy TWEN website.

Assignments: See Calendar posted on TWEN website (click on “View as List”).


Professor: Rush
Course Spring 2014 Constitutional Law
Law 5501 Section 01G8
Course Materials: Erwin Chemerinsky, Constitutional Law (4th ed), published by Aspen Press. You will not need the supplement.

Assignments: The text is Erwin Chemerinsky, Constitutional Law (4th ed), published by Aspen Press. You will not need the supplement. For our first class on Tuesday, Jan. 7, please read Marbury v. Madison, pp. 1-9 in the text. For Thursday, please read Nixon, pp. 327-333.

The syllabus and a copy of the last exam will be available on TWEN no later than Jan. 3.

I’m looking forward to an exciting semester with you.


Professor: Seigel
Course Spring 2014 Criminal Law
Law 5100 Section 0134
Course Materials: Kadish, Schulhofer, Steiker & Barkow, CRIMINAL LAW AND ITS PROCESSES (9th Edition, Aspen Casebook Series, Wolters Kluwer Publishers 2012)

Change in class room. This class will be in 355B NOT 285C like stated on Syllabus.

Assignments: Read for Wednesday, January 8:
Pages 1-11, for background only.

Read for Thursday, January 9:
Pages 75-89. Please note: we will study Dudley & Stephens sentence by sentence.

Read for Friday, January 10:
Pages 89-98, 100, 104-124. This assignment is long and the reading is difficult. My advice is to get started on it prior to the start of the semester.

Syllabus: https://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Class_Information_and_Syllabus.pdf




Professor: Sokol
Course Spring 2014 Antitrust Health Care
Law 6930 Section 0273
Course Materials:
Assignments: Antitrust Health Care first Day’s reading:

Please read the following parts of the 2010 DOJ/FTC Horizontal Merger Guidelines (http://www.justice.gov/atr/public/guidelines/hmg-2010.html)
1. Overview
2. Evidence of Adverse Competitive Effects
2.1 Types of Evidence
2.1.1 Actual Effects Observed in Consummated Mergers
2.1.2 Direct Comparisons Based on Experience
2.1.3 Market Shares and Concentration in a Relevant Market
2.1.4 Substantial Head-to-Head Competition
2.1.5 Disruptive Role of a Merging Party
2.2 Sources of Evidence
2.2.1 Merging Parties
2.2.2 Customers
2.2.3 Other Industry Participants and Observers
3. Targeted Customers and Price Discrimination
4. Market Definition
4.1 Product Market Definition
4.1.1 The Hypothetical Monopolist Test
4.1.2 Benchmark Prices and SSNIP Size
4.1.3 Implementing the Hypothetical Monopolist Test
4.1.4 Product Market Definition with Targeted Customers
4.2 Geographic Market Definition
4.2.1 Geographic Markets Based on the Locations of Suppliers
4.2.2 Geographic Markets Based on the Locations of Customers
5. Market Participants, Market Shares, and Market Concentration
5.1 Market Participants
5.2 Market Shares
5.3 Market Concentration
6. Unilateral Effects
6.1 Pricing of Differentiated Products
6.2 Bargaining and Auctions
6.3 Capacity and Output for Homogeneous Products
6.4 Innovation and Product Variety
7. Coordinated Effects
7.1 Impact of Merger on Coordinated Interaction
7.2 Evidence a Market is Vulnerable to Coordinated Conduct
8. Powerful Buyers
9. Entry
9.1 Timeliness
9.2 Likelihood
9.3 Sufficiency
10. Efficiencies

The first day of class will be primarily lecture so that those without an antitrust background will be on an even playing field.



Professor: Sokol
Course Spring 2014 Law & Entrepreneurship
Law 6930 Section 1208
Course Materials:
Assignments: Two readings:

D. Daniel Sokol & D. Gordon, “Law and Entrepreneurship Summary,” available on TWEN

Financing New Ventures, William R. Kerr, Ramana Nanda, Harvard Business School Case Study 9-811-093 (2011) – available in online course-pack (I need your email to sign you up for it – sign onto TWEN)

Questions you need to answer (in one page) due the first day of class, before class - worth 5 percent of your grade

1. What role does law play in entrepreneurship?
2. Which sources of financing are most appropriate for a new venture?
3. How do you pitch your venture to potential funders?
4. How is valuation determined?
5. Provide two examples of exit strategies for the entrepreneur.



Professor: Soponis
Course Spring 2014 Leagl Drafting
Law 6955 Sections 1655 & 1680
Course Materials: Basic Legal Drafting

Assignments: Monday, January 6, 2014:

Read in textbook, Basic Legal Drafting, pages 1 through 28.



Professor: Steinberg
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 8249
Course Materials: See Syllabus

Assignments: Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/SteinbergAppAd_Syllabus.pdf


Professor: Stinneford
Course Spring 2014 Law & Literature
Law 6936 Section 12A6
Course Materials: Stinneford, Law & Literature Reading Packet

Herman Melville, Billy Budd (Hayford & Sealts, ed.)

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (Mahood, ed.)

Franz Kafka, The Trial (Breon Mitchell, trans.)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Chronicle of a Death Foretold (Gregory Rabassa, trans.)

Lawrence Joseph, Lawyerland

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov (Pevear & Volokhonsky, trans.)

Truman Capote, In Cold Blood

Sophocles, Antigone (in The Oedipus Cycle, Fitts & Fitzgerald, trans.)


Assignments: Jan. 10

A.What Can Literature Teach Us About Law? (packet pp. 3-26)

B. Melville’s Billy Budd and the Tragedy Of Formalism (Billy Budd, pack. pp. 27-38)

Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Stinneford_syllabus_2014_Stinneford.pdf

It will be a rough draft of the syllabus, and the pagination of some of the readings is likely to change.





Professor: Temple-Smith
Course Spring 2014 Legal Drafting
Law 6955 Sections 1677 & 1858
Course Materials: Basic Legal Drafting

Assignments: Monday, January 6, 2014:

Read in textbook, Basic Legal Drafting, pages 1 through 28.


Professor: Tomlinson
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 1540
Course Materials: Legal Writing by Design, Rambo & Pflaum, 2d Edition

The Bluebook - A Uniform System of Citation, 19th Edition

Course Materials for App Ad/Tomlinson (Yellow Book)(available for purchase at Law School Book Store)


Assignments: Please obtain the Yellow Book and review its contents. Read Chapters 13 and 14 of your text, Legal Writing by Design.

Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/TomlinsonAASylSp2014.pdf


Professor: Westin
Course Spring 2014 Collaborative Law
Law 6930 Section 118G
Course Materials: See Syllabus

Assignments: Syllabus: http://www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/WestonSYLLABUSFORCOLLABORATIVELAWrevised.pdf


Professor: Wihnyk
Course Spring 2014 Appellate Advocacy
Law 5793 Section 0118
Course Materials: Legal Writing by Design (Pflambo)by Tracy Rambo and Leanne Pflaum

The Bluebook 19th ed (Bluebook)

Assignments: READ: TWEN Materials - the following can be found at the Navigation links on the left side of the course home page:

•Grading and Course Policies

•Syl: Class Topics and Assignments - This contains a schedule of all class meetings and assignments. Click on “View as list” for the easiest way to read the calendar.

READ: PFLAMBO -
Chapters 13 & 14


Professor: Wihnyk
Course Spring 2014 Public Speaking for Lawyers
Law 6930 Section 1G83
Course Materials: David. J. Dempsey, Legally Speaking: 40 Powerful Presentation Principles Lawyers Need to Know. (Revised and Updated Edition)

The book is available only on Amazon. The law bookstore may have used copies.

Assignments: Students in this class must sign up for Prof. Wihnyk's TWEN version of this
course, “Public Speaking for Lawyers Spring 2014"


Required Text
David. J. Dempsey, Legally Speaking: 40 Powerful Presentation Principles Lawyers Need to Know. (Revised and Updated Edition)
The book is available only on Amazon. The law bookstore may have used copies.

The course syllabus is available on the course TWEN page.


Professor: Wolf
Course Spring 2014 Land Use Planning
Law 6460 Section 04EH
Course Materials: Charles M. Haar & Michael Allan Wolf, Land Use Planning and the Environment: A Casebook
Assignments: Our first class will meet on Wednesday, January 8, from 11-11:50 am in Room 270. For our first class, please read and be prepared to discuss Sunrise Check Cashing & Payroll Servs., Inc. v. Town of Hempstead, 986 N.E.2d 898 (N.Y. 2013). For our second and third classes on Thursday and Friday, please read and be prepared to discuss pages 1-44 (Chapter One) of the assigned casebook. Students are required to enrol in the LexisNexis Web Course for the class, through which I will be distributing discussion questions and other materials throughout the semester.


Professor: Wolf
Course Spring 2014 Supreme Court and the Environment
Law 6930 Section 05EE
Course Materials: Michael Allan Wolf, The Supreme Court and the Environment: The Reluctant Protector (CQ Press/Sage 2012). I am trying to arrange a discount from the publisher, and I will send you an email message when I get word on this.

Assignments: Our first class will meet on Wednesday, January 8, from 2-3:50 pm in Room 284. The assignment is pages 1-38 in Michael Allan Wolf, The Supreme Court and the Environment: The Reluctant Protector. Students are required to enrol in the LexisNexis Web Course for the class, through which I will be distributing discussion questions and other materials throughout the semester.


Professor: Womble
Course Spring 2014 Negotiation & Mediation
Law 6930 Section 13BE
Course Materials: See TWEN

Assignments: See TWEN


Professor: Womble
Course Spring 2014 Mediation Advocacy
Law 6383 Section 1277
Course Materials: See TWEN

Assignments: See TWEN


Professor: Wright
Course Spring 2014 Constitutional Law
Law 5501 Section 1343
Course Materials: Chemerinsky, Constitutional Law, 4th edition.

Assignments: My first day’s assignment for Section 1, Constitutional Law will be to read as followed:

Read the Constitution, pp. xli-lvii in the casebook, Chemerinsky, Constitutional Law, 4th edition.


Professor: Zedalis
Course Spring 2014 Trial Practice
Law 6363 Section 2259
Course Materials: Mauet’s Trial Techniques and Trials.

Assignments: First week assignment is chapters one and two in Mauet’s Trial Techniques and Trials.


Professor: Zedalis/Schwait
Course Spring 2014 Pretrial Practice
Law 6930 Section 0363
Course Materials: Mauet’s Pretrial.

Assignments: Chapters one and two in Mauet’s Pretrial.


Professor: Zheng
Course Spring 2014 International Business Transactions
Law 6930 Section 14D4
Course Materials: International Business Transactions: Problems, Cases, and Materials
By Daniel C.K. Chow and Thomas J. Schoenbaum (Aspen Publishers, 2nd Edition)
ISBN: 978-0-7355-7065-8


Assignments: Syllabus: www.law.ufl.edu/_pdf/student-affairs/syllabus/14-spring/Zheng_IBT_Syllabus_Spring_2014.pdf







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