Representational competence

Professor argues courts should give criminal defendants greater opportunity to represent themselves By Kara Carnley-Murrhee While attempting to steal shoes form a downtown Indianapolis department store in July 1999, Ahmad Edwards fired three gunshots at a security officer, grazing him

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UF law alumni at the high court

When the Supreme Court of the United States convened for the 2009-10 term last fall, seven Florida cases were on its docket, representing nearly one-tenth of the cases scheduled to be heard. “The review of the Supreme Court of the United States is largely discretionary, so though they’re asked to review maybe 9,000 cases each year, they hear and write opinions on only 75 to 80,” said Sharon Rush, a professor of constitutional law at the Fredric G. Levin College of Law. “We assume that these cases that are granted certiorari are really important, that there’s some reason the court wants to hear them.”

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