Levin College of Law
  • Degree Programs
  • Curriculum Roadmaps
  • Experiential Learning
  • Concentration Areas & Certificate Programs
  • Centers
  • Institutes & Related Programs
  • CGR History-at-a-Glance

    1970s

    • Executive Impoundment project
    • Guide to Sunshine Laws
    • Constitution Revision Research

    1980s

    • Water Law Center Merger
    • Model Flood Management Ordinance
    • Family Law Added
    • Sea Grant Funding
    • International Law Added

    1990s

    • Poland Program Begins
    • PIEC Established
    • Historic Preservation Study
    • Haiti Program
    • Florida Supreme Court Externship
    • Conservation Clinic Begins

    2000s

    • International Trade Law Program Begins
    • Americas Conference Established
    • Summer Program in Costa Rica
    • Election Law Database
    • Summer Program for Brazilians

    2010s

    • Florida Farm Workers Survey
    • Rumberger Fellowship Established
    • Human Rights in Colombia Grant

    The Center for Governmental Responsibility at the University of Florida College of Law began in 1972 as the result of a $66,000 grant from the McIntosh Foundation of South Florida to study the cutting by President Richard Nixon of housing and civil rights programs funding.

    Success of that study and subsequent suing of the federal government, filing of an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court in a case involving the Environmental Protection Agency plus other high-profile cases around the country resulted in additional funding by the McIntosh Foundation. CGR was organized permanently for research and public policy work under founding director (who continues to head the Center’s leadership more than 40 years later) Jon Mills, UF law Dean Emeritus.

    Topically, the Center has grown to cover a wide variety of major projects, policies and programs. CGR expanded to include domestic and international programs in environmental law, social policy law, government law, and trade law. The Center’s staff now includes eight research and teaching faculty, and two support personnel – and each year multiple members of the UF law faculty partner in various CGR activities.

    Constituencies for CGR have expanded from Florida courts and lawyers to the U.S. Supreme Court and federal agencies and to lawyers and students involved in projects on four continents – with students taught by and involved in applied research by CGR faculty.