First Day Assignments

Fall 2017

Administrative Law

Course number: 6520 | Section number: 01E1 | Professor name: Flournoy

Course materials:

The text for this course is: Cass Diver Beerman & Freeman, Administrative Law (7th edition 2016). There is a syllabus for the course as well as an assignment sheet with the reading assignments and study questions for the entire first week of classes posted on the course website on Canvas, under Syllabus and Modules respectively.

Assignments:

Tuesday, August 15

Read pp. 1-25 and U.S. Const. Art. 1 §1, Art. 1 §8, & Art. II §1 cl.1 (reprinted on pp. 905, 908 & 909 of your casebook)

 

1.         We’ll spend the first part of the hour on an introduction to administrative agencies building on the material in pp. 1-15, then we’ll turn to the non-delegation doctrine.  Consider the description of OSHA in the reading.  Make a list of the types of activities OSHA engages in.

 

3.         How were different powers allocated to different entities under the OSH Act?  What is the explanation suggested by public choice theory as to why the OSH Act was enacted and the particular form it took? What is the explanation suggested by a public interest account of the enactment?

 

4.         Look at the language authorizing promulgation of standards in sections 3(8) and 6(b) of the Act (found on p. 10 of the reading).  These are the key standards that govern workplaces.  Where on the scale of generality to specificity do these standards fall? 

 

5.         Why is the delegation of legislative power unconstitutional?  What are the constitutional foundations for the non-delegation doctrine and the arguments that it is a sound principle?  We’ll survey the different standards the Supreme Court has used in various cases: the Brig Aurora, Field v.Clark, Hampton, Panama Refining, Schecter Poultry, and Yakus.  Consider the questions in note 2 on pp. 19-20.

 

 

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Advanced Trusts & Estates

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 067F | Professor name: McCouch

Course materials:

Assignments:

For the first class (Wed., Aug. 16), please read the handout (posted on the TWEN page), review the questions for class discussion, and read at least one of the articles cited as background reading. Those articles are available electronically on Westlaw and Lexis; links should also be posted on ARES.

 

Agricultural Law and Policy

Course number: 6474 | Section number: 0832 | Professor name: Olexa

Course materials:

Please see Syllabus

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Child, Parent & State

Course number: 6714 | Section number: 0655 | Professor name: King

Course materials:

Children & the Law: Doctrine, Policy and Practice (5th ed. 2014) by Douglas E. Abrams;  Sarah H. Ramsey; Susan V. Mangold.

Assignments:

In the required text, please read the Preface, the Table of Contents and pages 1-17 for the first class.

 

Also, by our first class, I will have set up a TWEN site for this course. I will post a course description and will post other documents relating to the course.  You should register on the TWEN site as soon as possible to ensure that you receive all announcements and assignments.  I use the TWEN email system to communicate about schedule, assignment, and other issues.  To sign on, go to the law school page of Westlaw and click on the TWEN icon. Register as a participant in the “Child, Parent & State (Prof. King)” course.

Civil Clinic-Family Advocacy Clinic

Course number: 6940 | Section number: 4828 & 7628 | Professor name: Grater

Course materials:

Course: Civil Clinic – Family Advocacy, Law 6940, Sections 4828 and 7628 (Note that the Lab is just part of the family advocacy clinic, and meets in the same room).

 

Course Materials: The full syllabus, objectives and design, assignments, class schedule, etc., are posted on canvas. Assuming you are enrolled in the course, you should be able to log in to canvas at: https://ufl.instructure.com/. If you are unable to access this course, please wait a couple of hours; it might not have been released yet.

 

Assignments:

1st Class Assignments: Please explore our canvas course (don’t neglect announcements) and do the assigned readings and written assignments.

 

Note: I hope to have a two hour class each weekday for the first two weeks to prepare you to represent clients. We will work around your schedules.

 

Contact Heather Flynn at flynnh@law.ufl.edu if you have any questions.

 

Civil Clinic-Juvenile Law

Course number: 6940 | Section number: 73BC | Professor name: Rawls

Course materials:

Florida Rules of Juvenile Procedure and Rules of Judicial Administration, 2017 edition (required) and Florida Juvenile Law and Practice 14th Edition (recommended).

 

Assignments:

The First Week Assignments are available on Canvas. The course has been published and students who are enrolled in the clinic should have access to the Juvenile Law Clinic course.  Please e-mail Professor Rawls at rawls@law.ufl.edu or her assistant, Coreen Yawn at yawn@law.ufl.edu if you have any problems or questions.

 

Civil Tax Procedure

Course number: 7640 | Section number: 089G | Professor name: Ullman

Course materials:

Johnson, Borison & Ullman, Federal Tax Procedure, 3d Ed. (Carolina Academic Press, Graduate Tax Series, 2016).

 

Assignments:

Assignment for First Class (August 14, 2017).

 

Read and be prepared to discuss Chapter 1 and the materials listed on page 3 of the text (focus carefully on IRC §7805(a) – (e); we will not go over the problems at the end of the chapter in class).

 

Read and be prepared to discuss:

—          Chevron U.S.A. Inc., 467 U.S. 837 (1984) (Read section II of the opinion).

—          Smiley, 517 U.S. 735 (1996) (Read 740-744).

—          Auer, 519 U.S. 452 (1997) (Read 461-463).

—          United States Dominion Industries, Inc., 532 U.S. 822 (2001) (Read 838).

—          Brand X, 545 U.S. 967 (2005) (Read 980-983).

—          Mayo, 131 S. Ct. 704 (2011) (Read 713).

—          Loving, 742 F.3d 1013 (DC Cir. 2014).

—          King v. Burwell, 135 S. Ct. 2480 (2015).  (Read 2488 and 2489, reproduced in text at pages 41-42).

 

Note:  Do not spend too much time on the facts or substantive issues in these cases, except for Loving.  You should focus on the validity of administrative regulations (e.g., Treasury Regulations) and lower level administrative authorities (e.g., Revenue Rulings), and the level of deference to which they are entitled.  With respect to Loving, please review the entire opinion, including the facts and the substantive law.

 

Assignment for Second Class (August 15, 2017).

 

Read and be prepared to discuss Chapter 2, the materials listed on page 43 of the text, and problems 2,4,6,7,8,9,11,13,and 14.

 

Read and be prepared to discuss:

—          IRC §§ 7502 (a), (b), (e), (f) and 7503.

—          IR 2002-135 (12/11/02).

—          Treas. Regs. §301.7502-1(a)-(d).

—          IRC §6061.

Constitutional Law

Course number: 5501 | Section number: 005H & 04CC | Professor name: Dowd

Course materials:

Course materials:  Erwin Chemerinsky, Constitutional Law (5th edition 2017); any supplemental cases will be posted on TWEN under CASES.  For the first week, the assigned case is on TWEN.

Please sign on to the course website.  The full syllabus is there; a briefing guide; and this is always the place to look for course information.

Assignments:

Week 1:

  1. Introduction:  Constitutional Interpretation

Week one:

xli-lvii The Constitution;

11-13, limits on the federal judicial power, interpretive limits (including Second Amendment introduction but not the case, District of Columbia v. Heller)

State of Washington v. Trump, 9th Circuit 2017) (on TWEN)

First class:  discussion on the structure and content of the Constitution; preliminary discussion on constitutional interpretation; and begin State of Washington v. Trump

Second and third class:  continue discussion of State of Washington v. Trump

 

First case

Our first case is available on TWEN:

State of Washington v. Trump, decision of Ninth Circuit, February 9, 2017

If you are interested in reading the decisions on the second executive order, they are also posted on the TWEN site. These are not required reading.

State of Hawaii v Trump, March 15, 2017 and June 12, 2017

International Refugee Assistance Project et al v Trump, March 16, 2017 and May 25, 2017

United States Supreme Court order granting review

Constitutional Law

Course number: 5501 | Section number: 0622 | Professor name: Hernandez

Course materials:

Constitutional Law, 5th ed., Chemerinsky, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-4548-7647-2.

 

Unless otherwise indicated, the reading assignments refer to the required casebook.  Every student is expected to have completed the assigned readings prior to class.

Students also are expected to read additional materials as indicated and as posted on the Canvas page, usually in either pdf or html format.  Adobe Reader 6.0 or higher should be used to view pdfs, otherwise you may experience some difficulties. Students should check Prof. Hernández’s Canvas Course page on a regular basis for updates to the online materials and readings. Dates of last update are given for your convenience.

Note:  In order to inform the course materials, we will start classes with a current event that implicates a constitutional issue.

 

Assignments:

Read the Constitution (pages xli-lvii) and complete the list of questions below.

 

U.S. CONSTITUTION QUESTIONS FOR FIRST CLASS

 

Knowing what the Constitution says and appreciating how the document is organized are important for understanding constitutional law. These questions will test your knowledge of the original United States Constitution — Articles I through VII and the 27 amendments. As you read the Constitution, find the provisions (cite the article and section) that provide the information to answer these questions. Prepare written answers to as many of the questions as possible. You are to do this assignment by yourself. You will have to do some basic historical research (easily done using Internet websites) in order to answer a few of these questions, but do not spend more than 10 minutes on any one question.

Here is an important hint: The questions will take you through the seven articles of the Constitution and the amendments in order (that is the first questions relate to Article I, then there are Article II questions, and so on).

  1. One of the states in 1802 has a white male population of 200,000 (10,000 of whom are indentured servants); a white female population of 120,000 (5,000 of whom are indentured servants); a Native American population of 15,000; a free black population of 15,000; and a black slave population of 60,000. What population figure will be used to determine that state’s representation in the House of Representatives?
  2. If Pat Reyott is elected to the House of Representatives in the election of 1808, in the absence of a special provision, on what date will he take his seat with his colleagues?
  3. What is the smallest numbers of Senators it would have taken to convict President Madison in an impeachment trial in 1812?
  4. The “Saxbe Fix” was used for Senator Clinton in order to avoid the strictures of what provision in Article I?
  5. On December 4, 1801, the House of Representatives passed a bill and sent it to the Senate, which passed the bill on December 11 and sent it to President Jefferson the same day. The President put the bill in his vest pocket, where it stayed for the next twelve days. Congress adjourned on December 23. Did the bill become a law before Congress adjourned?
  6. There are three Commerce Clauses. What are they?
  7. Where does the Constitution suggest that Congress has authority to enact statutes that are not specifically authorized by Article I?
  8. In 1809, Senator Mancy Pator from Vermont introduced a bill to outlaw the importation of slaves from other countries. His fellow Senator from Vermont, Lee Burty, asserted that the bill was unnecessary as such importation was already forbidden by the Constitution. Is Senator Burty correct?
  9. True or false: The federal government, like that of the states, cannot impair the obligation of contracts.
  10. The actress Charlize Theron is a “Citizen of the United States.” Why can’t she be President?
  11. According to the original, unamended Constitution, was John Tyler ever the President?
  12. Does the Supreme Court have the power to hear an admiralty case before it has been tried in a lower court?
  13. Does a state have to have an elected upper and a lower legislative chamber? Does the state have to have an elected legislature at all?
  14. Does the Constitution authorize the people to call a new constitutional convention during which time new amendments can be added to the Constitution?
  15. What one provision of the original Constitution still, in 2016, is not amendable?
  16. How is it possible that several states required officeholders to adhere to certain religious beliefs even after the passage of the Constitution?
  17. Explain: The United States Constitution took effect on June 21, 1788.
  18. True or false: Based on the language of the First Amendment, a state, the President, or a federal agency can abridge freedom of speech and prohibit the free exercise of religion.
  19. According to the Fifth Amendment, under what circumstances can a person be deprived of his or her property, and under what circumstances can that person have his or her private property taken by the government?
  20. What one part of the Fifth Amendment made its way into the Fourteenth Amendment?
  21. What part of Article IV of the original Constitution made its way into the Fourteenth Amendment (slightly reworded)?
  22. According to the Fourteenth Amendment, what penalty do states face if it is determined that they engaged in voter suppression?
  23. According to the Twenty-second Amendment, why was President Lyndon Baines Johnson eligible to run for re-election in 1968 (he chose not to run), even though he first became President back in 1963?
  24. How long did it take between the time that the Twenty-seventh Amendment was introduced and ratified? Were any other amendments introduced at the same time, and were they all made part of the Constitution?

 

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Constitutional Law

Course number: 5501 | Section number: 005G | Professor name: Hutchinson

Course materials:

Readings for this course are contained primarily in the following text: Kathleen M. Sullivan & Noah Feldman, Constitutional Law (Nineteenth Edition). Students should also purchase any available supplement to this text. Also, Professor Hutchinson will inevitably assign readings from handouts or from reserve materials during the course of the semester.

Assignments:

WEEK ONE

 

Aug. 14

Introduction: The Constitution and the Articles of Confederation

Read: Articles of Confederation, The Constitution of the United States of America, Related Handouts (see emailed and posted assignment)

 

Aug. 15

The Supreme Court’s Authority and Role

Judicial Review: 1-16.

 

Aug. 16

Judicial Review, continued: 16-34

 

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Consumer Law

Course number: 6040 | Section number: 2D45 | Professor name: Drysdale/Murphy

Course materials:

PORTER, MODERN CONSUMER LAW (Wolters Kluwer, 2016). Also, we will maintain a course website through Westlaw’s TWEN services. From time to time, we may post announcements, slides, answers to questions, syllabus amendments, and other materials on this site.

 

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Contracts

Course number: 5000 | Section number: 4520 | Professor name: Fenster

Course materials:

All assignments are in Michael Hunter Schwartz and Adrian J. Walters, CONTRACTS: A CONTEXT AND PRACTICE CASEBOOK (2d ed., Carolina Academic Press 2015), unless otherwise noted; James Byrne, CONTRACTS TEXTS: RESTATEMENT 2D CONTRACTS, UCC ARTICLE 2 AND CISG (5th ed., Institute of International Banking Law and Practice).

Assignments:

First class: Casebook, pp. xxix-xxxiii; 3-12

 

Before the first week of classes, you might also consider reading Orin Kerr, “How to Read a Legal Opinion.”

 

Second class: Casebook, pp. 15-39 (for now we will only discuss the Chapter Problem); and Statutory Supplement, Restatement §§ 17, 22, 24, 50, 59, 61, 33 & UCC §§ 2-204(3), 2-305, 2-308 to 2-310.

I have posted a syllabus and additional readings for the first week of class on the TWEN site I’ve created for the course.

 

Contracts

Course number: 5000 | Section number: 1H89 | Professor name: Davis, J.

Course materials:

Contracts; Cases & Materials Farnsworth et.al 8th Ed.

Assignments:

Pages 1-9

Copyright Law

Course number: 6572 | Section number: 066C | Professor name: Travis

Course materials:

Copyright in A Global Information Economy 4th ED.; Cohen & Loren

Assignments:

Class 1: Casebook, pp. 61-67, 73-79 (through Problems), 83-88, 89 (note 4) 

Class 2: Casebook, pp. 3-8, 11-18, 22 (note 3), 23-34, 49-54

 

Creditors, Remedies, & Bankruptcy

Course number: 6052 | Section number: 09F7 | Professor name: Davis, J.

Course materials:

Law of Debtors & Creditors, 7th ED. By Warren, Westbrook, Porter & Pottow

Assignments:

Pages 53-75, Problem set 1

Criminal Law

Course number: 5100 | Section number: 0023 | Professor name: Johnston

Course materials:

The casebook for our course is Kadish, Schulhofer, & Barkow, Criminal Law and Its Processes (10th Ed. 2017).

Assignments:

The first two classes will cover my expectations for the course, why we punish, and theories of punishment.  Before the first day of class, please skim pages 1-18, which provide background information on the criminal justice system. Then carefully read pages 96-105, 107 (note 3a only), 117-22 (skip note 2 on page 120), the bottom of 123-29, and 130-31 (note 3 only). Also please sign up for our TWEN site and review our course policies. See you all soon!

 

Criminal Law

Course number: 5100 | Section number: 4585 | Professor name: Jacobs

Course materials:

Assignments:

Read in Kaplan, Weisberg, Binder pg 1-19

The material in this reading will not be covered in class but you must know it to understand what will be covered in class.

It will be clear to me, fairly quickly, if you have not read it by the time we start. Be responsible and prepare yourselves.

 

Criminal Law

Course number: 5100 | Section number: 4590 | Professor name: Nunn

Course materials:

Kadish, Schulhofer, & Barkow, Criminal Law and Its Processes (10th ed. 2017)

 

Recommended: Dressler, Understanding Criminal Law (any edition is fine)

 

 

 

 

Assignments:

Aug. 14th

 A.  Introduction to the Course

            Readings:  1-7

 B. Why Punish?

            Readings:  96-106

 

Aug. 16th

 A. Why Punish? (Cont.)

      Readings:  106-118

 B. Theories of Punishment

     Readings:  118-132

 

Criminal Procedure-Adversarial System

Course number: 6112 | Section number: 063G | Professor name: Nunn

Course materials:

1. Dressler and Thomas, Criminal Procedure: Prosecuting Crime (6th ed. 2017)

 

2. Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure: Available at: http://www.uscourts.gov/sites/default/files/rules-of-criminal-procedure.pdf

Assignments:

Aug 15

 1.  Introduction to the Course

            (No readings)  

                       

Aug 17

 2. The Scottsboro Tragedy

            (In-class video)

 

 

Criminal Procedure: Police Practices

Course number: 6111 | Section number: 5001 | Professor name: Jacobs

Course materials:

Assignments:

Read in Miller & Wright

Tues: 1-21

Wed: 21-41

 

Employment Law

Course number: 6545 | Section number: 026C | Professor name: Bornstein

Course materials:

The required casebook for this course is Crain, Kim & Selmi, Work Law: Cases and Materials (3rd ed., 2015).

Assignments:

The assignments for the first week of class are as follows:

 

  1. Wednesday, August 16, 2017

The meaning of work; Historical contexts

CB pp. 3-6 (through n.4 first paragraph); 8 n.5 only; 9(B.)-17; 19-20 n.5 only; 21(C.)-22; 28(2.)-30 (through n.2)

 

  1. Thursday, August 17, 2017

20th-Century legal developments; Individual rights model

Who is an “employee”?

CB pp. 33; 38(D.)-41; 49(B.)-52; 58-59 n.2-4; 74(2.)-89

 

 

The syllabus for the first half of the course will be posted on the course TWEN page by Wed., Aug. 9. Please register for the page using the password “employment.”

Energy Law & Policy

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 0664 | Professor name: Stein

Course materials:

No textbook is required. Materials are available on Westlaw, the Internet, or TWEN. You must register for TWEN

Assignments:

  1. 8/15  Introduction & Course Overview: Introduction to Electric power Systems and Public Utility Law
    • Eisen, et al., Chapter 1 of Energy, Economics and the Environment, TWEN
    • Utility Dive, 2017 Trends, TWEN
    • Charles River bridge, 36 U.S. 420 (1837)
    • Munn v. Illinois, 94 U.S. 113 (1877)
    • Florida Public Service Commission (PSC), Mission http://www.psc.state.fl.us/AboutPSC/PSCMission

     

    Assignment:

    1. Find the Florida Code Provision discussing the Duties of the Florida PSC Regarding electricity; and
    2. News article on any hot topic in energy that adds something new to these readings
    3. Email them both to me by 9am on Tuesday

 

2. 8/22  Grid Primer and Jurisdiction

  • Section 201, 16 U.S.C. § 824
  • Section 205, 16 U.S.C. § 824d
  • Section 206, 16 U.S.C. § 824e
  • FPC v. Southern CA Ed, 376 U.S. 205 (1964)
  • FPC v. FLP, 404 U.S. 453 (1972)

 

Assignment: identify an upcoming FERC jurisdictional battle and email it to me by 9am Tuesday.

Evidence

Course number: 6330 | Section number: 02BB | Professor name: Malavet

Course materials:

  • The basic materials for the course such as assignment sheets and the course syllabus will be posted on my webpage: http://nersp.osg.ufl.edu/~malavet
  • The assignments for the class sessions for our first week of the Fall 2017 will be posted below
  • Future assignments will be posted in the Assignments and Notes Page of the course webpage. (This page has now been updated for the entire Fall of 2016, including references to the current edition of the casebook. I will update them for the Fall of 2017 as we progress through the material).
  • The required class materials are: (1) Christopher B. Mueller and Laird C. Kirkpatrick, EVIDENCE UNDER THE RULES (8th. ed., Aspen Law & Business 2015; ISBN: 978-1-4548-4952-0); (2) Mueller & Kirkpatrick, 2017: Federal Rules of Evidence: With Advisory Committee Notes and Legislative History (Aspen Law & Business 2017; ISBN: 978-1454882589).
    • DO NOT PURCHASE A USED SUPPLEMENT: The Rules Supplement is the 2017 edition, newly-issued in the summer of 2017. You are allowed to annotate the supplement with your own outline and no other supplement will be allowed in the examination room. You must purchase a printed version of the supplement if you wish to use it during the exam. Access to electronic versions will not be permitted during the examination.
    • Open Rules. “Open-Rules” means that you may have with you during the examination your required 2017 Mueller & Kirkpatrick Federal Rules of Evidence supplement. No substitutions will be allowed. Your supplements may be annotated with handwritten notes, but shall not have any attachments other than tabs to mark the location of specific material (the tabs may have on them numbers and the short titles of the referenced material and nothing more). Only handwriting may cover the blank spaces and the original printing on the supplements. The use of stick-on labels or paper, white-out or any other method to eliminate any of the original printing is prohibited. Other than the addition of handwritten notes and tabs, the supplements shall be in their original condition, no material may be added nor may any material be removed in any way. The supplements must be in their original bound form at the start of and throughoutthe examination.

Assignments:

Week One: August 14-16, 2017

    • Chapter: 1.0 Evidence Law and the System
    • Monday, August 14, 2017
      • Session 1
        • Class rules, testing, grading and administrative matters.
        • Review the Syllabus.
        • 1.1 Introduction: Why Evidence & The Trial, 1-20
        • Pay special attention to What is the Record?, 13-20
    • Tuesday, August 15, 2017
      • Session 2
        • 1.2 How is Evidence Admitted, 20-31
        • Problem 1-A: How did it happen? (p. 26)
    • Wednesday, August 16, 2017
      • Session 3
        • 1.3 How Evidence is Excluded, 31-43
        • Consequences of Evidential Error, 44-50
        • Obtaining Review of Evidence Points, 50-51
        • Problem 1-B: He didn’t object! (p. 50)

Power Point PDFs

  • I will post PDF files with the Power Point slides that I use in class in the eLEARNING/CANVAS course page. Click the eLearning link on the banner at the top of this page to login and download the files. The files are in the “Files” section of the course page.

Federal Indian Law

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 066G | Professor name: Amdur-Clark

Course materials:

The required text for this course is Getches et al., Cases and Materials on Federal Indian Law, 7th ed. 2017 (Getches). In addition, readings will be assigned from Newton et al., Cohen’s Handbook of Federal Indian Law, 2012 ed. (Cohen’s), which is on reserve in the library and also available on Lexis, as well as various publically-available sources as noted herein.

 

For optional and supplemental materials, I suggest Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Federal Indian Law, (2016) from West’s Hornbook Series, as well as William C. Canby, American Indian Law in a Nutshell, 6th ed. 2015.

Assignments:

August 15: Introduction of course and materials

Getches Chapter 1 (skim); by noon on August 14, please email me a short paragraph explaining why you chose to take this course.  This is not graded, but rather simply a way for me to understand the interests of the students in the class, so as to make sure we cover them if at all possible.

 

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Florida Administrative Law

Course number: 6521 | Section number: 0641 | Professor name: Sellers

Course materials:

Please log onto our E-Learning Course Page, which is where all of the materials for the course will be posted throughout the semester.

Please do review the Course Syllabus. I will spend a bit of time talking about some parts of it in the first part of our first class.

Assignments:

Assignment for August 18, 2017

For the first part of our first day, I will give you a broad overview of Administrative Law in general, the topics we will cover regarding Florida’s Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 120, Florida Statutes), and their significance in determining rights of persons regulated by Florida’s executive branch of state government – essentially, everyone.

For the second part of the class, we will look at the Florida Legislature’s role in establishing the state’s fundamental policy and how courts determine whether the Legislature has usurped that role by passing on that responsibility to executive branch agencies. 

Please log onto our E-Learning Course Page, which is where all of the materials for the course will be posted throughout the semester.

Please do review the Course Syllabus. I will spend a bit of time talking about some parts of it in the first part of our first class.

Reading Assignment:   Please read the following, which is posted in our Class Materials – Required Module on the E-Learning Course Page:

  1. Florida Constitution, Article II, section 3.
  2. Bush v. Schiavo, 885 So. 2d 231 (Fla. 2004)
  3. House Bill 35E (2003).

Also, please review and/or download the Powerpoint Slide presentation titled “Florida’s Nondelegation Doctrine,” which will be posted by Monday, August 14, in the Powerpoint Slides by Topic Module on our Course E-Learning Page.   We will use this powerpoint as the guide for our examination and discussion of the topic of Nondelegation in Florida. 

I always encourage discussion in class, and value your participation. So, after completing the reading, please be thinking about nondelegation, how you know it when you see it, why it’s a concern (at least for Florida courts), how Florida’s nondelegation doctrine differs from the federal nondelegation doctrine, and whether you think that’s a good (or bad) thing, from a public policy perspective.

I am looking forward to meeting you and looking forward to a great semester of Florida Administrative Law.

 

Florida Constitutional Law

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 2D50 | Professor name: Mills

Course materials:

The print-out bound course-materials from last year are identical and can be purchased at www.bookit.com.bz under the “Law School” tab or by calling Book iT! at 352-371-9588.

Assignments:

Please see Syllbabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Future Interests

Course number: 6433 | Section number: 089B | Professor name: Wright

Course materials:

Wright, The Law of Estates and Future Interests: Cases, Exercises, and Explanations, (Foundation Press, 2015).

Assignments:

First Day’s Reading Assignment: Read pp. iii-viii and 1-18 and come to class with at least three questions you have about how, if at all, this historical material might be relevant today.

 

Second Day’s Reading Assignment: Read pp. 19-36.

 

I will distribute on the second day a full schedule of the reading assignments and quiz dates.

 

Historic Preservation

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 5318 | Professor name: McLendon

Course materials:

The mandatory readings (cases, articles, many statutes and regulations) have

been combined in a course pack. [Per UF regulation, this professor is

required to state that he has no financial interest in whether students

purchase the course pack.] Course materials will be available for purchase

at Book iT, 1250 W. University Ave. (N.W. 13th St. & University Ave.-in

the Holiday Inn Building), ph.# 352-371-9588. Students are also free to

download the materials themselves. Some additional material is available on

TWEN and a few items have been placed on reserve in the Law Library.

A current compendium of relevant federal historic preservation statutes is

available for free online at:

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/historicpreservation/laws.htm.

Other supplementary materials will be distributed in class or placed on

reserve in the Law Library in Bruton-Geer Hall.

 

Assignments:

  • Printed course-materials can be purchased at www.bookit.com.bz under the “Law School” tab or by calling Book iT! at 352-371-9588, store located on 1250 W University Ave, Unit 2 (Holiday Inn on 13th & Univ.)

 

  • Sign up on TWEN for the course website. The syllabus is also posted on TWEN site.

 

  • Read the following from the course materials:
  1. Findings of the National Committee on Historic Preservation, from With Heritage So Rich (Nat’l Trust, 1966, rep. 1983).
  2. United States v. Diaz, 499 F.2d 113 (9th Cir. 1974).
  3. United States v. Smyer, 596 F.2d 939 (10th Cir. 1979).

 

  • Also, review the following 2 background articles:
  1. W. Brown Morton III, What Do We Preserve and Why?, in The American Mosaic: Preserving a Nation’s Heritage (Robert E. Stipe & Antoinette J. Lee, eds., US/ICOMOS, 1987).
  2. Robert E. Stipe, Historic Preservation: The Process and the Actors, in The American Mosaic: Preserving a Nation’s Heritage (Robert E. Stipe & Antoinette J. Lee, eds., US/ICOMOS, 1987).

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Immigration Law

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 276C | Professor name: George

Course materials:

Course textbook: T. Alexander Aleinikoff et al., Immigration and Citizenship: Process and Policy (8th edition).

Statutory supplement: T. Alexander Aleinikoff et al., Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States: Selected Statutes, Regulations and Forms. We’ll often refer to page numbers in this statutory supplement. Alternatively, you can download sections from any online database.

 

The syllabus and class materials are posted on Canvas (https://ufl.instructure.com).

 

Assignments:

Week 1. August 18, 2017: Historical Context, Foundation Cases, and the Trump Executive Orders

Read pages 151-195 and materials on Trump Travel Ban (on Canvas)

Income Taxation of Estates & Trusts

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 1828 | Professor name: Calfee

Course materials:

Course materials for the first day will be available in the Office of Graduate Programs, room 320, on the 3rd floor of Holland Hall.  Thereafter course material will be provided in class by the Professor.

 

Federal Internal Revenue Code Section & Regulations covering Sub Chapter J including Related income tax provisions.

Assignments:

Monday, August 14, 2017

Problem #1 – Read Code, Regulations & Statutes listed under “Assignment”. Provide answers to problems.

 

Please look to the state law of the state in which you intend to practice and ascertain whether that state uses a version of the 1931, 1962, or 1997 Uniform Statute.

International Commercial Arbitration Moot ICAM

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 13F8 | Professor name: Johnsen

Course materials:

International Sales Law and Arbitration:  Problems, Cases and Commentary, by Joseph Morrissey and Jack Graves (Aspen/Kluwer 2008) (“Graves”)

Assignments:

Week One: Monday,  August 14 and Tuesday, August 15

 

Class 1 – Gary Born Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A31M9ImBaiA  and Read through the CISG, Graves, Chapter 1:  The Study of International Law

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

International Corporate Law

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 068A | Professor name: Gonzalo

Course materials:

All texts for class will be made available to you in class or online at no cost to you.   A printed course packet of readings will be made available to you each week for those reading assignments that are not available electronically through Westlaw or Lexis.  Some reading assignments will be available in print and electronically.   In those cases, a few copies of the text will be placed on reserve in the law school library for your convenience.  They will be available on a first come, first serve basis.  Those reading assignments only available online can be accessed electronically from Westlaw and Lexis.

These books will be available on reserve:

  • International Business Transactions.  Practitioner Treatise Series with IBT Resources and Sample Agreements.  Folsom, Ralph H.  (both volumes)
  • Manual of Foreign Investment in the United States, ed. by Marans, et al (West)

International Regulation of Finance & Investment by Raphael J. Rabalais, series editor

Assignments:

Below where it says syllabus, is a reading packet for the assignments.

  1. Ventoruzzo, Marco and Conac, Pierre-Henri and Goto, Gen and Mock, Sebastian and Notari, Mario and Reisberg, Arad, Comparative Corporate Law: Look No Further (July 2, 2015). Bocconi Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2626021. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2626021 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2626021; Ch. 1 pgs. 1-29.

 

  1. The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in the Practice of Law.  Soft Skills – The Importance of Cultivating Emotional Intelligence.  AALL Spectrum, January/February 2016; Boston Univ. School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 16-06 Pg.1-5.  Online Link located at:  https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2719155#

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Internet and Computer Law

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 067A | Professor name: Travis

Course materials:

Software & Internet Law 4th Ed.

Assignments:

Class 1, Hour 1: Casebook, pp. 319-326, 333-334 (notes 3-4), 360-61 (notes 1-2), 385-394, skim 374-385. Optional: 1153-1155, 1162-1179

Class 1, Hour 2: Online articles:

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/local/explainer/article/Explained-the-controversy-with-ICANN-9443357.php

https://www.ip-watch.org/2017/02/28/icann-moving-toward-copyright-enforcement-academic-says/

 

Introduction to Lawyering

Course number: 5755 | Section number: 005D | Professor name: Flournoy

Course materials:

(1)  Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr., Essential Lawyering Skills: Interviewing, Counseling, Negotiation, and Persuasive Fact Analysis, (Wolters Kluwer 5th Edition 2015). 

 

(2)  Other necessary materials, including the Course Syllabus, are available to you on the Canvas site as posted documents or links to documents under the “Modules” tab on the left hand side. You may access the course Canvas site by going to https://ufl.instructure.com/. Once you log in using your GatorLink information, you will see the course, Introduction To Lawyering, listed there. If you have trouble accessing the site after you are registered for the course, please let us know.  

 

Assignments:

Classes 1&2:       Please read the Course Syllabus (on Canvas site); Chapter 2 in Text; and Overview of Lawyering (on Canvas site)

 

Classes 3&4:       Please read Chapter 3 in Text and The Path Between Sebastian’s Hospital (on Canvas site) (pp. 89–99, 107–113, 125–27)

 

 

Introduction to Lawyering

Course number: 5755 | Section number: 11AG | Professor name: Cohen

Course materials:

(1)  Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr., Essential Lawyering Skills: Interviewing, Counseling, Negotiation, and Persuasive Fact Analysis, (Wolters Kluwer 5th Edition 2015). 

 

(2)  Other necessary materials, including the Course Syllabus, are available to you on the Canvas site as posted documents or links to documents under the “Modules” tab on the left hand side. You may access the course Canvas site by going to https://ufl.instructure.com/. Once you log in using your GatorLink information, you will see the course, Introduction To Lawyering, listed there. If you have trouble accessing the site after you are registered for the course, please let us know.  

 

Assignments:

Classes 1&2:       Please read the Course Syllabus (on Canvas site); Chapter 2 in Text; and Overview of Lawyering (on Canvas site)

 

Classes 3&4:       Please read Chapter 3 in Text and The Path Between Sebastian’s Hospital (on Canvas site) (pp. 89–99, 107–113, 125–27)

 

Introduction to Lawyering

Course number: 5755 | Section number: 114H | Professor name: Cohen

Course materials:

(1)  Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr., Essential Lawyering Skills: Interviewing, Counseling, Negotiation, and Persuasive Fact Analysis, (Wolters Kluwer 5th Edition 2015). 

 

(2)  Other necessary materials, including the Course Syllabus, are available to you on the Canvas site as posted documents or links to documents under the “Modules” tab on the left hand side. You may access the course Canvas site by going to https://ufl.instructure.com/. Once you log in using your GatorLink information, you will see the course, Introduction To Lawyering, listed there. If you have trouble accessing the site after you are registered for the course, please let us know.  

 

 

Assignments:

Classes 1&2:       Please read the Course Syllabus (on Canvas site); Chapter 2 in Text; and Overview of Lawyering (on Canvas site)

 

Classes 3&4:       Please read Chapter 3 in Text and The Path Between Sebastian’s Hospital (on Canvas site) (pp. 89–99, 107–113, 125–27)

 

Introduction to Lawyering

Course number: 5755 | Section number: 17GE | Professor name: Johnsen

Course materials:

(1)  Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr., Essential Lawyering Skills: Interviewing, Counseling, Negotiation, and Persuasive Fact Analysis, (Wolters Kluwer 5th Edition 2015). 

 

(2)  Other necessary materials, including the Course Syllabus, are available to you on the Canvas site as posted documents or links to documents under the “Modules” tab on the left hand side. You may access the course Canvas site by going to https://ufl.instructure.com/. Once you log in using your GatorLink information, you will see the course, Introduction To Lawyering, listed there. If you have trouble accessing the site after you are registered for the course, please let us know.  

 

Assignments:

Classes 1&2:       Please read the Course Syllabus (on Canvas site); Chapter 2 in Text; and Overview of Lawyering (on Canvas site)

 

Classes 3&4:       Please read Chapter 3 in Text and The Path Between Sebastian’s Hospital (on Canvas site) (pp. 89–99, 107–113, 125–27)

 

Introduction to Lawyering

Course number: 5755 | Section number: 07C6 | Professor name: Nance

Course materials:

(1)  Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr., Essential Lawyering Skills: Interviewing, Counseling, Negotiation, and Persuasive Fact Analysis, (Wolters Kluwer 5th Edition 2015). 

 

(2)  Other necessary materials, including the Course Syllabus, are available to you on the Canvas site as posted documents or links to documents under the “Modules” tab on the left hand side. You may access the course Canvas site by going to https://ufl.instructure.com/. Once you log in using your GatorLink information, you will see the course, Introduction To Lawyering, listed there. If you have trouble accessing the site after you are registered for the course, please let us know.  

 

 

Assignments:

Classes 1&2:       Please read the Course Syllabus (on Canvas site); Chapter 2 in Text; and Overview of Lawyering (on Canvas site)

 

Classes 3&4:       Please read Chapter 3 in Text and The Path Between Sebastian’s Hospital (on Canvas site) (pp. 89–99, 107–113, 125–27)

 

Introduction to Lawyering

Course number: 5755 | Section number: 07C7 | Professor name: Angelo

Course materials:

(1)  Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr., Essential Lawyering Skills: Interviewing, Counseling, Negotiation, and Persuasive Fact Analysis, (Wolters Kluwer 5th Edition 2015). 

 

(2)  Other necessary materials, including the Course Syllabus, are available to you on the Canvas site as posted documents or links to documents under the “Modules” tab on the left hand side. You may access the course Canvas site by going to https://ufl.instructure.com/. Once you log in using your GatorLink information, you will see the course, Introduction To Lawyering, listed there. If you have trouble accessing the site after you are registered for the course, please let us know.  

 

Assignments:

Classes 1&2:       Please read the Course Syllabus (on Canvas site); Chapter 2 in Text; and Overview of Lawyering (on Canvas site)

 

Classes 3&4:       Please read Chapter 3 in Text and The Path Between Sebastian’s Hospital (on Canvas site) (pp. 89–99, 107–113, 125–27)

 

Introduction to US Law Part 1

Course number: 7932 | Section number: 26E0 | Professor name: Malavet

Course materials:

Welcome to the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law!  I look forward to the start of classes on Tuesday, August 15, 2017.

First Day Assignment: Law 7932, Introduction to US Law Part I

Your assigned texts are:

  • William Burnham, Introduction to the Law and Legal System of the United States (6th Ed. 2016).
  • Handout No. 1: Introduction to the Comparative Method, a pdf materials handout that I edited that is available on my web page: http://nersp.osg.ufl.edu/~malavet/index.shtml.

Assignments:

  • For our first class on Tuesday, August 15, 2017, please download handout number 1, Introduction to the Comparative Method, and
  • Read Chapter 1, pages 1-30.

Law & Literature

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 067C | Professor name: Stinneford

Course materials:

 

Required texts

 

Stinneford, Law & Literature Reading Packet

Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter (ISBN-13: 978-1907947964)

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (Folger Shakespeare Library) (ISBN-13: 978-0743477567)

Franz Kafka, The Trial (Breon Mitchell, trans.) (ISBN-13: 978-0805209990)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Chronicle of a Death Foretold (ISBN-13: 978-1400034710)

Albert Camus, The Stranger (ISBN-13:  978-0679720201)

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov (Pevear & Volokhonsky, trans.) (ISBN-13: 978-0374528379)

Truman Capote, In Cold Blood (ISBN-13: 978-0679745587)

Sophocles, Antigone (in The Oedipus Cycle, Fitts & Fitzgerald, trans.) (ISBN-13: 978-0156027649)

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Legal Drafting

Course number: 6807 | Section number: 4745 | Professor name: Fernandez

Course materials:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Assignments:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Legal Drafting

Course number: 6807 | Section number: 4753 | Professor name: Temple-Smith

Course materials:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Assignments:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Legal Drafting

Course number: 6807 | Section number: 4734 | Professor name: Knight

Course materials:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

 

Assignments:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Legal Drafting

Course number: 6807 | Section number: 4735 | Professor name: Cupples

Course materials:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Assignments:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Legal Drafting

Course number: 6807 | Section number: 4754 | Professor name: Menendez

Course materials:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Assignments:

”In the textbook, Legal Drafting, read pages 1 – 13.  Also, purchase “Legal Drafting Client Files” at Target Copy on W. University Avenue.  Since laptops are not permitted in class, bring to class note-taking materials.”

Legal Research

Course number: 5803 | Section number: Section V | Professor name: Vallandingham

Course materials:

 

 

 

Assignments:

Prior to our first class on Friday, August 18, read the following:

  1. The course syllabus, which will be posted on the course website on August 11;
  2. Chapter 1 in Impeccable Research by Mark Osbeck.  Be prepared to answer questions on this chapter.

 

Bring your textbook and laptop to class, along with your WestlawNext, Lexis Advance, and Bloomberg Law passwords.

Legal Research

Course number: 5803 | Section number: Section R | Professor name: Purcell

Course materials:

The full syllabus, required texts, assignments, class schedule, etc., are posted on canvas. Assuming you are enrolled in the course, you should be able to log in to canvas using your GatorLink information at: http://elearning.ufl.edu/. If you are unable to access this course, please try again at a later time; it might not have been published yet.

 

Assignments:

1st Class Assignments:

Please explore our Canvas course and read the Syllabus posted.

 

Legal Writing

Course number: 5792 | Section number: 1161 | Professor name: Tomlinson

Course materials:


Legal Writing by Design, Rambo & Pflaum, 2d Edition  (Referred to hereafter as Design)

The Bluebook – A Uniform System of Citation, 20 Ed. th

Course Materials for Legal Writing, Professor Tomlinson  (Available for purchase at Law School Book Store)

Suggested: Grammar, Punctuation & Style, Cupples & Temple-Smith

Assignments:

FIRST CLASS, Monday, August 16

Take a tour of your textbooks and materials! Read over Tables of Contents, Indexes (or Indices if you prefer), Headings, and Graphics, and study organization to become familiar with your required reading materials.

READ – Chapters 27, 1, and 2 of Design.

The reading assignments will improve your comfort level, I hope, for your very first days in Law School! They will also give you some background for lecture and discussion during class.

TO DO: Please write your name in all of your books.

I LOOK FORWARD TO MEETING YOU!

 

Legal Writing

Course number: 5792 | Section number: 117A | Professor name: Ruff

Course materials:

  • Rambo & Pflaum, Legal Writing by Design: A Guide to Great Briefs and Memos (Carolina Academic Press 2013, 2d ed.) (Design).
  • The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (Columbia Law Review Assn. et al. eds., 20th ed.) (Bluebook).
  • Course Packet for my section available for purchase at the law school bookstore during the week before fall classes begin.
  • Course Supplemental Materials posted on the course website at TWEN (TWEN). I’ll send you an email message with instructions for accessing the course website.
  • The following text is recommended: Cupples & Temple-Smith, Grammar, Punctuation, & Style: A Quick Guide for Lawyers and Other Writers (West 2013) (“Cupples Guide”)

Assignments:

First Class, Wednesday, August 16

READ:

  • Design: Chapter 5, Sections 5.1 – 5.4.
  • Course Packet: “Introduction to Legal Writing & Course Policies” under tab by this name.
  • TWEN: All documents in the Class 1 folder on the Class Discussion Materials document page; legal memoranda examples on the Example Memoranda document page (skim).
  • WATCH:
  • TWEN: “Sources of the Law: The Court System,” and “How Courts Make Decisions: Stare Decisis and Precedent” videos accessed through the Links to Videos document page.
  • HAND IN:
  • Completed Student Information Sheet/Acknowledgment of Course Policies form at the end of “Introduction to Legal Writing & Course Policies.”
  • Your résumé.

Legal Writing

Course number: 5792 | Section number: 117B | Professor name: McLendon

Course materials:

Linda Edwards, Legal Writing: Process, Analysis & Organization (6th ed., 2016).

Richard Wydick, Plain English for Lawyers (6th ed., 2005).

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (20th ed., 2016).

Additional Course Materials available on TWEN

Also suggested: Deborah Cupples & Margaret Temple Smith, Grammar, Punctuation & Style: A Quick Guide for Lawyers & Other Writers (2013).

 

Assignments:

FIRST CLASS: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Sign up for course website on TWEN

Read: Course syllabus & calendar (available on TWEN); Edwards text, introduction & chapter 1; 1st Day Assignment on TWEN (DWI Issue)

 

Discuss: Welcome to Legal Writing; Overview of course; DWI Issue from TWEN (Facts, Statute & Case)

 

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Legal Writing

Course number: 5792 | Section number: 117C | Professor name: Jackson

Course materials:

ALWD Guide to Legal Citation (5th ed.) – required

Dworsky, The Little Book on Legal Writing (2d ed.) – recommended

 

Assignments:

The tentative syllabus and other course materials are posted on TWEN. For our first class on Aug. 15, download and read Lucy v. Zehmer and be prepared to discuss the rules it establishes regarding (1) intoxication and (2) lack of serious intent as defenses to the enforcement of a contract. If you run into problems accessing the site or downloading Lucy v. Zehmer, please email me at jjackson@law.ufl.edu

 

Legal Writing

Course number: 5792 | Section number: 1163 | Professor name: Pflaum

Course materials:

Legal Writing by Design, Rambo and Pflaum (2d ed) (Design)*

The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (20th ed.) (The Bluebook) *

Materials (Legal Writing § R – Pflaum) – purchase at law school bookstore (available August 9, 2017).

• TWEN (Westlaw) Legal Writing and Appellate Advocacy course (2017-18) (Pflaum)*

Recommended text:

Grammar, Punctuation & Style: A Quick Guide for Lawyers and Other Writers, Cupples and Temple-Smith

*You will also use these texts in Appellate Advocacy during the Spring 2018 Term.

Also Required:

• Establish a ufl.edu email account

• Sign up for TWEN access (through Westlaw) to Professor Pflaum’s Legal Writing and Appellate Advocacy course (2017-18) TWEN site before the first day of class by using your ufl.edu mail address only — the law school email system filters out AOL and other email accounts. No password required.

 

Assignments:

All reading assignments are in the Design text unless otherwise noted – omit Design chapter exercises unless specifically assigned.

Wed. 8/16 Class 1: Introduction to Logic, Legal Writing & Thinking Like a Lawyer

Read: Introduction and Chapter 1 (Design text).

Materials:

• Quick Calendar; Syllabus; Course Policies – (read and sign acknowledgment and address form and turn in class 3).

Assign: Chapter 1, § 1.12 Exercises 1 and 3 for in-class discussion.

In class: Chapter 1, § 1.12 Exercises 1 and 3.

 

Legal Writing

Course number: 5792 | Section number: 117D | Professor name: Wihnyk

Course materials:

Students in this class must sign up for Prof. Wihnyk’s TWEN version of this course, “Legal Writing (Fall 2017) and Appellate Advocacy (Spring 2018) §W

You will find the link to the TWEN course at http://www.lawschool.westlaw.com (You must obtain your Westlaw password duringorientation)

When you get to the site, click on the TWEN tab and follow the instructions for adding the TWEN course. For assistance call 1(800) – westlaw

 

Required Texts

A Lawyer Writes 2d ed. (TEXT)

by Coughlin, Rocklin, Patrick

The Bluebook 20th ed. (Bluebook)

Assignments:

Assignment for First Class

READ:

●TWEN

-Syllabus: Course Description, Grading Policies, My Expectations, Class Meetings andAssignments

-Writing Assignment #1 Materials

●TEXT

-Introduction,

-Chapters 1 & 2

Also, generally familiarize yourself with the other materials available on the course TWENpage

 

Legal Writing LLM

Course number: 7805 | Section number: 2F79 | Professor name: Wihnyk

Course materials:

WELCOME TO UF!

Students in this class must sign up for Prof. Wihnyk’s TWEN version of this course, “LL.M. in Comparative Law – Legal Writing (Fall 2016).

You will find the link to the TWEN course at http://www.lawschool.westlaw.com (You must obtain your Westlaw password duringorientation)

When you get to the site, click on the TWEN tab and follow the instructions for adding the TWEN course. For assistance call 1(800) – westlaw

 

 

Required Texts

A Lawyer Writes 2d ed. (TEXT) by Coughlin, Rocklin, Patrick

The Bluebook 20th ed. (Bluebook)

Assignments:

READ:

●TWEN

-Syllabus: Course Description, Grading Policies, My Expectations, Class Meetings andAssignments

●TEXT

-Introduction,

-Chapters 1 parts I and II A (pages 3-9)

Also, generally familiarize yourself with the other materials available on the course TWENpage

 

Local Government Law

Course number: 6531 | Section number: 09F5 | Professor name: Little

Course materials:

Little, Local Government COURSE MATERIALS (Fall 2017). (Locally printed; book store)

 

Assignments:

First Assignments: READ: Syllabus, How Things Are Done, Addendum (etc.), Oath of

Admission, Table of Contents, Chapter 1, pp. 1-35.

Meeting dates: M, Tu, W (11:00 a.m.)

Meeting room: 355D

Read the assigned materials. Porltions of the assigned pages are attached. PAY

PARTICULAR ATTENTION TO “HOW THINGS ARE DONE.”

J. Little, Instructor

 

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Mediation

Course number: 6383 | Section number: 8110 | Professor name: Davis, R.

Course materials:

Getting to Yes (entire book)

Mediation Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition, Alfini et al.        

Assignments:

Assignment Due: Read: Getting to Yes (entire book); Chapter 44 Fl. Statutes; Mediation Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition, Alfini et al.  p. 1-26        

Mediation Advocacy

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 1099 | Professor name: Sch

Course materials:

REQUIRED TEXT:  Mediation Representation:  Advocating as a Problem Solver (3rd edition) by Harold L. Abramson

 

OTHER RECOMMENDED RESOURCES: Can We Talk: Readings in Mediation Advocacy (Fall 2011) by Don Peters; Mediation Advocacy (2nd edition) by John W. Cooley

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Mediation Clinic

Course number: 6940 | Section number: 8134 | Professor name: Davis, R.

Course materials:

Getting To Yes

County Mediators Manual

Assignments:

Read Getting To Yes (Entire Book) ; County Mediators Manual p. 1-6

Mental Health

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 08H0 | Professor name: Johnston

Course materials:

The textbook for the course is Slobogin et al., Law and the Mental Health System: Civil and Criminal Aspects (6th ed. 2014)

Assignments:

In the first week of class, we will discuss mental disorders and the financing of treatment.  The textbook for the course is Slobogin et al., Law and the Mental Health System: Civil and Criminal Aspects (6th ed. 2014).  For the first week, please read these pages in the textbook: 4 – top of 14 (skip “psychodynamic model” at 11-12), 15 (start at note 3) – 27, 55 – top of 56, 65 – top of 68, 69 – top of 74​.  [If your book has not yet arrived, I’ve made the case book’s reading available on our TWEN cite.]  You may opt to read these optional articles, which are also posted on our TWEN site: Article: Common brain changes found in children with autism, ADHD and OCD; Tampa Bay Times: The WHO says being transgender is a mental illness — but that could soon change; Article: Is Workaholism a Mental Illness?.  I look forward to seeing each of you soon.

Natural Resources Law

Course number: 6472 | Section number: 07A1 | Professor name: Klein

Course materials:

TWEN: Please register on the class TWEN site, using an email address that you check daily. You can find the course syllabus there with detailed reading assignments for the semester.

 

Assignments:

 

Assignments: All assignments are in Klein, Cheever & Birdsong, Natural Resources Law: A Place-Based Book of Problems and Cases (Aspen 3d ed. 2013).

 

Aug. 15: Pages 1-31

 

Aug. 19: No new reading, but be prepared to discuss the problems on pp. 2 and 28.

 

 

Patent Law

Course number: 6573 | Section number: 0203 | Professor name: Rowe

Course materials:

All students are required to register on the course TWEN® site.  The syllabus is available on TWEN.  The required text for this course is Merges and Duffy, Patent Law and Policy: Cases and Materials,  6th  Edition (2013). 

 

Assignments:

Please read pages 13-26 for the first day of class.  You should also download and review the course syllabus.

 

Privacy Law

Course number: 6936 | Section number: 01F1 | Professor name: Mills

Course materials:

PRIVACY: THE LOST RIGHT by JON L. MILLS (Oxford Univ. Press, 2008).

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Professional Responsibility

Course number: 6750 | Section number: 03HG | Professor name: Reid

Course materials:

I look forward to meeting you!!!

For our first class, please do the following:

Please go to my Canvas website to access and read the Course Policies and Syllabus, to upload the Acknowledgment form, and to access and read the item from the Florida Bar.  The “Text” refers to our course book pages you are to read.   The “Model Rules Preamble and Scope” refer to the initial section in our rule book that you are to read.   Thank you!

Assignments:

WEEK 1                For all weeks, please use our Canvas website to access information regarding pages to read from our textbook, Rules and Comments to read from our rulebook, and links to the additional assigned readings. 

 

M, Aug. 14      Class 1           Chapter 1: The Regulation of Lawyers

A. Institutions that regulate lawyers

B. State ethics codes 

 

Course Policies contained below in this document (and on Canvas) and submit the Acknowledgment form on line via Canvas by 9:00 a.m. on the first day of class (Class 1).

 

Text:     xxvii-xxx; pp. 1 – 42

 

Model Rules Preamble and Scope

 

The Florida Bar 2014-16 Professionalism Handbook: Please look through this document and the other links at this site to familiarize yourself with the content.  You will not be tested on this information, but you need to know how to access it and you will need it (the most current version of the Rules) when you become a member of the Florida Bar.

https://www.floridabar.org/prof/presources/presources001/

 

 

Social Justice Lawyering

Course number: 6816 | Section number: 2D72 | Professor name: Flocks

Course materials:

Required: The main text will be Martha R. Mahoney, John O. Calmore, and Stephanie M. Wildman (MCW), “Cases and Materials on Social Justice:  Professionals, Communities, and Law,” Second Edition (2013).  ISBN:  9780314926982. Available at the Law School bookstore.

 

Please register on the class TWEN site. The class syllabus and additional required readings are posted there. TWEN readings are italicized in the syllabus.

 

Assignments:

Week 1:  Introduction to Social Justice Lawyering 

8/14:    Readings:  “Theoretical Foundations for Social Justice Education” (Lee Anne Bell);  “The Complexity of Identity – ‘Who Am I?’” (Beverly Daniel Tatum) –  Available on TWEN. 

8/15:    Readings: “A Call to Context: The Professional Challenges of Cause Lawyering at the Intersection of Race, Space, and Poverty” (John Calmore) pp. 1932-1940 – Available on TWEN.

            In Class: DVD Start “William Kunstler – Disturbing the Universe.”

8/16:    In Class: DVD Finish and discuss “William Kunstler – Disturbing the Universe.”

 

Taxation of Gratuitous Transfers

Course number: 6620 | Section number: 09B7 | Professor name: McCouch

Course materials:

The casebook for the course is Bittker, Clark & McCouch, Federal Estate and Gift Taxation (West, 11th ed. 2015). Students should also have a current edition of the relevant provisions of the Code and Regulations. Optional supplementary reading is McNulty & McCouch, Federal Estate and Gift Taxation (West, 8th ed. 2015).

 

Assignments:

A syllabus and supplementary materials will be posted on the TWEN page for the course.

The assigned reading for the first week of class is Chapter 1 of the casebook, especially pages 17- 27.

 

Taxation of Gratuitous Transfers

Course number: 7623 | Section number: 5182 | Professor name: Calfee

Course materials:

Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, 9th Student Edition, Stephens, Maxfield, Lind, & Calfee (Thomson Reuters/WG&L)

 

Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, 9th Edition Study Problems, Stephens, Lind & Calfee (Thomson Reuters/WG&L)

 

Federal Estate and Gift Taxes: Code and Regulations, as of 2017 (CCH)

Assignments:

Monday, August 14, 2017

 

The assignment for the first class is listed under Problem #1 in the Study Problems Book.

 

Torts

Course number: 5700 | Section number: 4598 | Professor name: Stein

Course materials:

REQUIRED TEXTS

 Farnsworth & Grady, Torts: Cases and Questions, Second ed. (Aspen 2009)

 

OPTIONAL RECOMMENDED SUPPLEMENTAL REFERENCE TEXT

 Glannon, The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (5th edition) or any other recent edition

 

TWEN

 Please register as a participant in this course on The West Education Network (TWEN). The course is listed under my name, and a full syllabus is located there.  Please review it before our first class. 

 

Assignments:

Class TOPIC READING
INTENTIONAL TORTS
1

8/14

Introduction to Torts;  Battery: Intent

 

 

Introduction (pp. xxxv-xlviii) pp. 1-9 (through note 7)
2

8/15

Battery: Minimum Requirements and Consent

 

pp. 9-15

Torts

Course number: 5700 | Section number: 01FB | Professor name: Noah

Course materials:

Franklin et al., Tort Law and Alternatives (Foundation Press 10th ed. 2016)

 

Assignments:

Assignments

[after Aug. 6th, once you have received Westlaw registration info., you can access the syllabus and supplement for this course on our TWEN site]:

• Aug. 15 (Tue.): pp.1-27 (skim pp.9-19), 31-33

• Aug. 16 (Wed.): pp.35-52, Supp. p.1 [posted w/ syllabus]

• Aug. 17 (Thu.): pp.53-71

 

 

Trademark Law

Course number: 6576 | Section number: 066D | Professor name: Rowe

Course materials:

You must register on the course TWEN® page and can access the syllabus on that site. The required text for this course is Dinwoodie and Janis, Trademarks and Unfair Competition 4th Edition (2014).  

 

Assignments:

Please read the Trademark section of “A Trademark is Not a Copyright” on TWEN and pages 39-41 of the casebook for the first day of class.   You should also download and review the course syllabus.

 

Trial Advocacy

Course number: 6360 | Section number: 4820 | Professor name: Zissimopulos

Course materials:

Please see Syllabus

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Trial Practice

Course number: 6363 | Section number: 4824 | Professor name: Zedalis

Course materials:

Textbook and Course Materials:

(1) Thomas A. Mauet, Trial Techniques and Trials, latest edition preferred (Aspen)

(2) Workshop/Trial Coursebook: available for this course on TWEN and also in hard copy at Book-It

(3) Florida Evidence Code Summary Trial Guide (available at the Levin College of Law Bookstore)

 

Other Good Resources (not required, suggested):

Carlson, A Student’s Guide to Elements of Proof (Thomson West)

Ehrhardt, Florida Evidence

Ehrhardt, Florida Trial Objections.

Imwinkelried, Evidentiary Foundations

Dubin and Guernsey, Trial Practice (Anderson)

Lubet, Modern Trial Advocacy (NITA)

McElhaney, Trial Notebook (ABA)

 

Assignments:

Please see syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Trial Practice

Course number: 6363 | Section number: 5794 | Professor name: Schwait/DeThomasis

Course materials:

Please see Syllabus

Assignments:

Please see Syllabus

Course syllabus:

Download pdf.

Trusts & Estates

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 1C59 | Professor name: Tritt

Course materials:

The required text is Dukeminier, Lindgren & Sitkoff, Wills, Trusts, and Estates (10th ed. 2017)(Aspen Publishers).  You may also wish to purchase Thomas P. Gallanis, Uniform Trust and Estate Statutes (2016-2017 ed.)(Foundation Press).  Some students, however, prefer to download the statutes and corresponding commentary instead of purchasing the Uniform Statutes.  It’s up to you …

Please download and read course Syllabus from TWEN.

Assignments:

Be prepared to discuss the following:

 

Terms.

  1. Testamentary Transfers- pertaining to a Will or Testament.  Will is used largely for Testament, but adjective “testamentary” is still used, for example a trust created under a Will is a testamentary trust.  A Testamentary transfer is one by Will, as opposed to . . .
  2. Inter Vivos Transfers – “between the living” (i.e., inter vivos trusts, or living trusts)
  3. Succession
  4. Testamentary Freedom or Freedom of Disposition
  5. Intestacy/Intestate – without a Will
  6. Testate/Will
  7. Trust
  8. Bequeath, bequest (legatees) – a gift of personal property in a Will
  9. Devise (devisees) – a gift of land.
  10. Residuary Estate
  11. Gift
  12. Decedent
  13. Testator/Testatrix
  14. Personal Representative (Executor/Executrix; Administrator/Administratix)
  15. Trustee
  16. Probate Property
  17. Non-Probate Property
  18. “Going through Probate”
  19. “Proving a Will”
  20. Joint Tenancy
  21. Life Insurance
  22. Payable on Death (P.O.D.) Contracts

 

Introduction to Donative Freedom.

 

Read Syllabus

 

Casebook: Pages 1-40

 

In addition, please also read Shriners Hospitals v. Zrillic, 563 So.2d 64 (Fla. 1990)

Trusts and Estates

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 1F59 | Professor name: Wright

Course materials:

Danaya C. Wright, The Law of Succession: Wills, Trusts, and Estates (Foundation Press, 2013).

Assignments:

Class  Subject & Assignment

We will proceed through the book in order, from page 1 to the end.  I hope we can finish the book, but there may be sections that we will skip in the interests of time. Here are the first two reading assignments.  I will distribute a detailed daily list of reading assignments with the statute packet.

  1. Introduction and Donative Freedom

Read pp. vii-xix and 3-19

Fla. Stat. 731.201, 731.011

 

  1. Gifts and Limit on Donative Freedom, Family Protections, Administration

Read pp. 19-52

Fl. Stat. 731.102, 731.103, 732.901, 733.101 to 733.109, 733.201 to 733.6171, 735.201 to 735.2063, 735.301, 735.302. (you can skim these administration statutes – just get the basic details)

Wetlands and Watersheds

Course number: 6930 | Section number: 07B7 | Professor name: Angelo

Course materials:

There is not a textbook required for this class.  Most of the required readings for the class will be from the “Florida Bar Environmental and Land Use Law Treatise.”  To access the Treatise, you must join the Environmental and Land Use Section of the Florida Bar as a Student Affiliate Member.  Membership for students is $20 per year.  By becoming a member, not only will you have access to the Treatise (which can be very useful in summer jobs and other courses) but you will also have access to other resources provided by this Bar section.  Information about joining the Bar Section as a Student Affiliate is available here:

http://eluls.org/membership/

The membership application can be found at this link:

http://eluls.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Membership_Application_01-29-15.pdf 

Additional assigned readings (cases and rules) will be provided electronically through the TWEN site.

Assignments:

TWEN site:  A TWEN site has been set up for this course.  The syllabus, a detailed schedule, reading assignments and other information in available on the TWEN site.

First Two Weeks Reading Assignments:

For Wednesday, August 16, read Margaret Strand et al, ELI’S WETLANDS DESKBOOK, Introduction available on TWEN site

For Wednesday, August 23, read pages 37-80 of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Report to Congress, Status and Trends of Wetlands in the Conterminous United States 2004 to 2009 available on TWEN site